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AUTHOR OF "THE MARY FRANCES STORY-INSTRUCTION BOOKS"

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In these vital tasks of acquiring a broader view of
human possibilities the common school must have a large
part. I urge that teachers and other school officers
increase materially the time and attention devoted to
instruction bearing directly on the problems of com-
munity and national life.—WOODROW WILSON.

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
PHILADELPHIA

CHICAGO

Edua Tyeqils, 406

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF
ALBERT BUSHNELL HANT

DEC 5 1923

COPYRIGHT 1918 BY
THE JOHN C. WINSTON Co.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

CIVICS FOR AMERICAN CHILDREN

The notion of what constitutes adequate civics teaching in our schools is rapidly changing. The older idea was based on the theory that children were not citizens—that only adults were citizens. Therefore, civics teaching was usually deferred to the eighth grade, or last year of the grammar school, and then was mostly confined to a memorizing of the federal constitution, with brief comments on each clause. Today we recognize that even young children are citizens, just as much as adults are, and that what is wanted is not training for citizenship but training in citizenship. Moreover, we believe that the "good citizen” is one who is good for something in all the relationships of life.

HABIT FORMATION

Accordingly, a beginning is being made with the early school years, where an indispensable foundation is laid through a training in “morals and manners." This sounds rather old-fashioned, but nothing has been discovered to take its place. Obedience, cleanliness, orderliness, courtesy, helpfulness, punctuality, truthfulness, care of property, fair play, thoroughness, honesty, respect, courage, self-control, perseverance, thrift, kindness to animals,

safety first”—these are the fundamental civic virtues which make for good citizenship in the years to come. Of course, the object is to establish right habits of thought and action, and this takes time and patience and sympathy; but the end in view justifies the effort. The boy or girl who has become habitually orderly and courteous and helpful and punctual and truthful, and who has acquired

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