The works of Alexander Pope. With his last corrections, additions, and improvements; together with all his notes: pr. verbatim from the octavo ed. of mr. Warburton, Volum 4

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Side 49 - Hear this, and tremble! you, who 'scape the Laws. Yes, while I live, no rich or noble knave ^/ Shall walk the World, in credit, to his grave.
Side 27 - Me, let the tender office long engage To rock the cradle of reposing age, With lenient arts extend a mother's breath, Make languor smile, and smooth the bed of death; Explore the thought, explain the asking eye, And keep a while one parent from the sky ! On cares like these, if length of days attend, May Heaven, to bless those days, preserve my friend!
Side 12 - Pretty! in amber to observe the forms Of hairs, or straws, or dirt, or grubs, or worms! The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare, But wonder how the devil they got there.
Side 14 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he?
Side 4 - They pierce my thickets, through my grot they glide, By land, by water, they renew the charge, They stop the chariot, and they board the barge.
Side 13 - And born to write, converse, and live with ease: Should such a man, too fond to rule alone, Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne...
Side 167 - Bright through the rubbish of some hundred years ; Command old words, that long have slept, to wake, Words that wise Bacon or...
Side 6 - A virgin tragedy, an orphan muse.' If I dislike it, 'Furies, death and rage!' If I approve, 'Commend it to the stage.
Side 20 - Whose buzz the witty and the fair annoys, Yet wit ne'er tastes, and beauty ne'er enjoys : So well-bred spaniels civilly delight In mumbling of the game they dare not bite. Eternal smiles his emptiness betray, As shallow streams run dimpling all the way. Whether in florid impotence...
Side 41 - My head and heart thus flowing thro' my quill, Verse-man or prose-man, term me which you will, Papist or Protestant, or both between, Like good Erasmus in an honest mean, In moderation placing all my glory, While Tories call me Whig, and Whigs a Tory.

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