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To thus encourage the use of the system the committee suggest to the Conference that the complete alphabet of the Morse Code be inserted in the International Code Book for optional use.

AUG. GARDE,

Delegate for Denmark.
HENRI LANNELUC,

Delegate for France.
CHRISTIAN DONNER,

Delegate for Germany.
N. BOWDEN-SMITH,

Delegate for Great Britain.

H. A. P. CARTER,
Chairman of Committee, Delegate for Hawaii.

T. DE SOUZA Roza,

Delegate for Portugal.
FREDERICK MALMBERG,

Delegate for Sweden.
D. HUBERT,

Delegate for the Netherlands.
JOHN W. SHACKFORD,
Delegate for the United States.

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The undersigned desire to record that in signing the above report they do so without prejudice to the opinions they hold as to the desirability of giving special signals to use with fog-horns on board pilot-vessels.

CHRISTIAN DONNER,

Delegate for Germany.
N. BOWDEN-SMITH,

Delegate for Great Britain.
T. DE SOUZA ROZA,

Delegate for Portugal.
FREDERICK MALMBERG,

Delegate for Sweden.
D. HUBERT,

Delegate for the Netherlands.

APPENDIX A.

A SUPPLEMENTARY CODE OF THE BRITISH BOARD OF TRADE.

[As amended and recommended.]

Important signals which may be made at night or during fog, either by

flashes of white light or by a combination of long and short sounds on the steam-whistle, fog-horn, siren, bugle, etc.

[In the day-time they will be made by flags. ]

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE USE OF FLASHING OR SOUND SIGNALS.

1.

With flashing signals the lamp must always be turned towards the person addressed.

2.

To attract attention, a series of rapid short flashes or sounds should be made and continued until the person addressed gives the sign of attention by doing the same.

If, however, it is supposed that the person addressed can not reply, the signal may be made after a moderate pause, or under certain cir. cumstances, the communication may be made direct without preparatory signs.

3.

After making a few rapid short flashes or sounds as an acknowledge ment, the receiver must watch, or listen attentively until the communi. cation is completed, when he must make the sign indicated below, show. ing that the message is understood.

4.

If the receiver does not understand the message, he must wait until the signal is repeated.

5.

Duration of short flashes or sounds
Duration of long flashes or sounds
Duration of prolonged sound.....
Interval between each flash or sound.
Answer, or “I understand"

1 second.
3 seconds.
4 to 6 seconds.
1 second.

etc

SIGNALS.

JK You are standing into danger....
NP I want assistance. Please remain by me
QC Have encountered ice ...
PD The way is off my ship, you may feel your way past me
JB Stop, or beave to; I have something important to communicate...
PR. Am disabled. Communicate with me

When a vessel is in “tow," the following flashes or sounds may be made from her to the tug or towing vessel: KR Steer more to port ... KS Steer more to starboard..

PILOT SIGNALS DURING FOG.

For vessels requiriug pilots
For pilots wishing to offer their services...

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE UPON GENERAL DIVIS

IONS 9, 10, 11, AND 12 OF THE PROGRAMME.

COMMITTEE No. 3.

To consider and report upon General Divisions 9, 10, 11, and 12:

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REPORTING, MARKING, AND REMOVING DANGEROUS WRECKS OR OB

STRUCTIONS TO NAVIGATION.

(a) A uniform method of reporting and marking dangerous wrecks and derelicts.

(6) The division of labor, cost, and responsibility among the several maritime nations, either by geographical apportionment or otherwise

Of the removal of dangerous derelicts.

And of searching for doubtful dangers with a view of removing them from the charts,

GENERAL DIVISION 11.

NOTICE OF DANGERS TO NAVIGATION.

Notice of changes in lights, buoys, and other day and night marks.

GENERAL DIVISION 12.

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A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF BUOYS AND BEACONS.

(a) Uniformity in color of buoys.
(6) Uniformity in numbering of buoys.

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 28, 1889, Rear-Admiral S. R. FRANKLIN, U. S. Navy,

President International Marine Conference, etc.: SIR: In submitting their report the committee have thought it the most convenient plan to deal separately with each of the General Di. visions which have been discussed and considered by them.

GENERAL DIVISION 9.

WARNINGS OF APPROACHING STORMS.

(a) The transmission of warnings.
(6) The uniformity of signals employed.

(a) THE TRANSMISSION OF WARNINGS.
The committee understand that the various meteorological offices in
Europe are in frequent and intimate communication, and interchange
telegraphic information for the purpose of weather forecasting on that
side of the Atlantic Ocean, while the meteorological offices of the
United States and the Dominion of Canada act in concert on the West-
ern side, and also, that a similar custom prevails in many Eastern
countries.

Tbe preparation of the weather forecasts and the transmission of warnings regarding expected storms must, by the very nature of the subject, be dealt with locally; and it is, in the opinion of the committee, very questionable whether any useful purpose would be gained by the adoption of uniformity of methods except so far as the general progress of scientific knowledge indicates the direction of possible improvement, and this, it is hardly necessary to say, is more likely to be secured by work carried on independently rather than under any uniform system.

(6) THE UNIFORMITY OF SIGNALS EMPLOYED. Storm-warning signals were first introduced in the interests of the shipping or fishing vessels lying at anchor in harbor or proposing to put to sea. Lately the same warning-signals have been freely extended to

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