The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volum 2

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P. F. Collier & Son, 1899

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Side 309 - The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, Before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, From the beginning, Or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; When there were no fountains abounding with water.
Side 258 - Under these discouraging circumstances, a prudent magistrate might observe with pleasure the progress of a religion which diffused among the people a pure, benevolent, and universal system of ethics, adapted to every duty and every condition of life ; recommended as the will and reason of the supreme Deity, and enforced by the sanction of eternal rewards or punishments.
Side 22 - They died in torments, and their torments were embittered by insult and derision. Some were nailed on crosses; others sewn up in the skins of wild beasts, and exposed to the fury of dogs: others again, smeared over with combustible materials, were used as torches to illuminate the darkness of the night. The gardens of Nero were destined for the melancholy spectacle, which was accompanied with a horse race, and honoured with the presence of the emperor, who mingled with the populace in the dress and...
Side 104 - The space between the two metae or goals was filled with statues and obelisks; and we may still remark a very singular fragment of antiquity: the bodies of three serpents, twisted into one pillar of brass. Their triple heads had once supported the golden tripod which, after the defeat of Xerxes, was consecrated in the temple of Delphi by the victorious Greeks.
Side 92 - A crowd of temples and of votive altars, profusely scattered along its steep and woody banks, attested the unskilfulness, the terrors, and the devotion of the Grecian navigators, who, after the example of the Argonauts, explored the dangers of the inhospitable Euxine. On these banks tradition long preserved the memory of the palace of Phineus, infested by the obscene harpies ; and of the sylvan reign of Amycus, who defied the son of Leda to the combat of the Cestus.
Side 98 - Scythia, as far as the sources of the Tanais and the Borysthenes; whatsoever was manufactured by the skill of Europe or Asia; the corn of Egypt, and the gems and spices of the farthest India, were brought by the varying winds into the port of Constantinople, which, for many ages, attracted the commerce of the ancient world.
Side 89 - Grotius, it must be allowed, that the number of Protestants, who were executed in a single province and a single reign, far exceeded that of the primitive martyrs in the space of three centuries, and of the Roman empire.
Side 33 - ... the superstitious Pagans were convinced that the crimes and the impiety of the Christians, who were spared by the excessive lenity of the government, had at length provoked the Divine Justice.
Side 255 - But the devotion of Constantino was more peculiarly directed to the genius of the Sun, the Apollo of Greek and Roman mythology ; and he was pleased to be represented with the symbols of the God of Light and Poetry.
Side 94 - As the vicissitudes of tides are scarcely felt in those seas, the constant depth of the harbor allows goods to be landed on the quays without the assistance of boats; and it has been observed that in many places the largest vessels may rest their prows against the houses, while their sterns are floating in the water.

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