The Church of st. Patrick. Or, A history of the origin, doctrines [&c.] of the ancient Church of Ireland

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Side 93 - That dense population in extreme distress inhabited an island where there was an Established Church which was not their Church ; and a territorial aristocracy, the richest of whom lived in distant capitals. Thus they had a starring population, an absentee aristocracy, and an alien Church, and, in addition, the weakest executive in the world.
Side 67 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves; they did eat the dead carrions, happy where they could find them...
Side 94 - Well, what then would honorable gentlemen say if they were reading of a country in that position ? They would say at once, 'The remedy is revolution.
Side 94 - What then was the duty of an English minister ? To effect by his policy all those changes which a revolution would do by force. That was the Irish question in its integrity...
Side 46 - . Let him who profanes it be cursed. Beloved are Durrow and Derry, Beloved is Raphoe the pure, Beloved the fertile Drumhome, Beloved are Sords and Kells '. But sweeter and fairer to me The salt sea where the sea-gulls cry When I come to Derry from far, 81 O'DONNELL, ap.
Side 57 - ... the great roads, and in deserts ; on mountains and in valleys ;* on the sea, on ships ; on books and on weapons ; on wearing apparel, in the marriage chamber, at banquets, on vessels of gold and of silver, in pearls, in pictures on the walls, on beds...
Side 94 - ... of their farms and potato gardens to the established clergy, who, at the same time, possess all the estates and glebe lands that formerly belonged to the Catholic clergy...
Side 79 - Heaven, in glory and in dignity before the angels of Heaven. It is that Body, the same as it is in this great glory, which the righteous consume off God's Table, that is, the holy altar. For this Body is the rich viaticum of the faithful, who journey through the paths of pilgrimage and penitence of this world to the Heavenly fatherland. This is the seed of the Resurrection in the Life Eternal to the righteous. It is, however, the origin and cause of falling to the impenitent, who believe not, and...
Side 67 - ... insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves ; and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue therewithal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast...
Side 52 - It is impossible to doubt as to what the popes, even as early as the fifth century, believed themselves to be, or would fain be, in relation to the rest of the church, after having once listened to the language which they themselves hold on this subject. When a...

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