Senate Documents, Otherwise Publ. as Public Documents and Executive Documents: 14th Congress, 1st Session-48th Congress, 2nd Session and Special Session, Volum 11

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Champlain General description with statements showing the nature quantity
63
Cape Vincent A general description with tables exhibiting the Canadian trade
70
Genesee General description with tables illustrative of the Canadian trade
82
Presque Isle Description with tables showing the commerce of this district
161
Sandusky Description with tables giving details of Canadian and coasting trade
175
Miami General remarks with five tables showing import and export trade
184
DetroitGeneral description with tables illustrative of the nature and value
191
Mackinaw Description with a table showing the quantity and value of for
202
Milwaukie Description with a table showing the imports and exports of this
210
Summary A description of each of the great lakes in extent resources tribu
223
Report on the geology mineralogy and topography of the lands around Lake Superior
232
For Part III see Appendix
275
Railroads of New York
290
Railroads of New England
296
Connecticut and Rhode Island
302
New Jersey
308
Delaware
318
North Carolina
327
Florida
335
Louisiana
341
Kentucky
350
Indiana
362
Illinois
368
Wisconsin
374
Income of our railroads
384
Tabular statement showing the number of miles of railroad in progress and in operation
391
The Province of Canada
407
Flour and wheat exported from Canada in 1850 and 1851
413
Shipbuilding ships and tonnage built in 1849 1850 and 1851
421
Trade between Montreal and lower colonies
427
Statement of the value of goods imported at Boston and New York and thence forwarded
433
Up and down trade of St Lawrence canals in 1850 and 1851
439
Stateinent exhibiting the average tonnage of vessels built in the United States
440
Statement exhibiting the number of American and foreign vessels and also
445
Exports from Canada in 1851 and countries to which exported
451
Comparative statement of exports inland and by sea in 1851
457
Comparative statement of total duties at each port in Canada in 1850 and 1851
460
Tables 11 12 13 and 14 Showing the trade of Canada with the United States 464 to
477
and 23 Staple articles the produce of Canada exported from Quebec
490
Tables 24 25 26 27 28 and 29 Showing the exports from the port of Bruce to
500
Statistical view of the commerce of Canada exhibiting the value of imports
506
Value of imports and exports in 1849 1850 and 1851
583
Comparative statement of shipping inward and outward in 1849 1850 and 1851
584
American vessels arrived at St John in 1851 and places to which they sailed
602
Vessels entered and cleared in 1850
608
Official value of import and export trade in 1818 1819 and 1820
614
New Brunswick and Nova Scotia an extension of New England
620
and Prince Edward Island in 1851four tables
622
Trade of twentythree Atlantic ports with New Brunswick Nova Scotia Newfoundland
628
Statement of allowances to vessels employed in the fisheries
635
Table No 6 Imports of dry and pickled fish during the fiscal years 1843 to 1850
642
Table No 8 Pickled fish inspected in Massachusetts from 1838 to 1850 inclusive
652
PART XIII
661
Report on the great sea fisheries of France by a committee of the National Assembly
671
Quantity of dried cod exported from place where caught to colonies of France
680
APPENDIX
687
Valuation of real and personal estate of the inhabitants of the United States for
693
Quantity of dried cod of French catch exported from ports of France to foreign coun
694
Statement exhibiting the value of domestic produce and manufacture exported annually
699
Notes on the amount and tendency of Ohio commerce
705
Table of manufactures in Cincinnati for 1840 and 1850
711
Comparative statement exhibiting exports by canal of leading articles for three seasons
720
Railroads
726
Steam marine of the Mississippi valley
733
Statement of marine losses and insurance in several collection districts of the interior
741
Comparative statement showing the increase of steamboat tonnage on the upper lakes
745
Tabular view of the entire steam marine of the United States
751
Statement showing the value of exports and imports at New Orleans annually from 1834
758
Introductory notes upon the geographical and commercial position of Florida
764
Letter from Hon E C Cabell relative to internal improvements and general resources
770
The Gulf of Mexico and the Straits of Florida
794
The cotton crop of the United States and statistics relating thereto
805
Imports of cotton goods 1852
839
Total domestic produce exported including specie c since 1821
845
Exports and imports of Philadelphia and Baltimore from 1834 to 1851
852
Statement exibiting the same in the district of Philadelphia 837
858
Statement exhibiting the number and tonnage of vessels built in the United States
866
Statement showing the national character of foreign vessels entered and cleared
872
Esports and iinports of the principal commercial States of the Union for six years
875
Statement exhibiting the value of domestic exports from the principal commercial States
881
Commercial notices of Albany Troy and Waterford 829
890
Statement of the trade of the Pennsylvania canals at tidewater
898

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Side 644 - and creeks in Nova Scotia, Magdalen islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled; but so soon as the same, or either of them, shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such settlement, without a previous agreement
Side 645 - coast." We have, by this agreement, the liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, &c.; and when settled, with the grant of the proprietors of the ground. Some of our vessels have attempted to carry on the fishery as they had been in the habit of doing;
Side 404 - upon the subject of railroad management, could not fail to exert the most beneficial influence, by making public whatever is valuable in the experience of each company. The average cost of the roads of the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland is not far from
Side 644 - of his Britannic Majesty's dominions in America; and that the American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbors, and creeks in
Side 645 - States renounced any liberty before enjoyed or claimed by them, or their inhabitants, to take, dry, or cure fish, on or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbors of any of the British dominions of America not included within that part of the southern coast of Newfoundland extending from Cape Kay to the Rameau islands; on the western and northern coast of Newfoundland, from
Side 719 - The principle of private property has never yet had a fair trial in any country but this, and in no country where such conclusive proofs are furnished that the
Side 395 - of freight and character of the roads. Upon the average of such ways, the cost of transportation is not far from 15 cents per ton per mile, which may be considered as a sufficiently correct estimate for the whole country. Estimating at the same time the
Side 548 - of America, and all along the borders of the mighty Mississippi, from the Falls of St. Anthony to the Gulf of Mexico. Without the use of arms the French people conquered the savages of this continent; the cross of
Side ii - Letter of Spanish minister to acting Secretary of State, dated August 29, 1851 ." Letter of acting Secretary of State to the Spanish minister, dated August 30, 1851..". Same to United States attorney at New Orleans, dated September 1, 1851 Letter of Spanish minister to acting Secretary of State, dated September 6,
Side 588 - From the sea, Newfoundland has a wild and sterile appearance, which is anything but inviting. Its general character is that of a rugged, and, for the most part, a barren country. Hills and valleys continually succeed each other, the former never rising into mountains, and the latter rarely expanding into plains.

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