The Modern Origins of the Early Middle Ages

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OUP Oxford, 27. sep. 2013 - 400 sider
The Early Middle Ages, which marked the end of the Roman Empire and the creation of the kingdoms of Western Europe, was a period central to the formation of modern Europe. This period has often been drawn into a series of discourses that are more concerned with the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries than with the distant past. In The Modern Origins of the Early Middle Ages, Ian Wood explores how Western Europeans have looked back to the Middle Ages to discover their origins and the origins of their society. Using historical records and writings about the Fall of Rome and the Early Middle Ages, Wood reveals how these influenced modern Europe and the way in which the continent thought about itself. He asks, and answers, the important question: why is early-medieval history, or indeed any pre-modern history, important? This volume promises to add to the debate on the significance of medieval history in the modern world.
 

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Innhold

1 300700
1
2 The Franks and the State of France
19
3 The Old German Constitution
37
4 The Barbarians and the Fall of Rome
52
5 Empire and Aftermath
74
6 Nation Class and Race
94
7 The Lombards and the Risorgimento
113
8 Heirs of the Martyrs
137
11 Teutons Romans and Scientific History
199
The Impact of the Great War
222
Interpretations of the Migration Period from 1918 to 1945
245
14 Christian Engagement in the Interwar Period
268
15 The Emergence of Late Antiquity
287
16 Presenting a New Europe
310
Bibliography
330
Index
365

9 Language Law and National Boundaries
154
10 Romans Barbarians and Prussians
174

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Om forfatteren (2013)

Ian Wood is Professor of Early Medieval History at the University of Leeds.

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