Summer in the Antarctic Regions: A Narrative of Voyages of Discovery Towards the South Pole

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1848 - 203 sider
 

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Side 139 - ... expedition, yet it restored to England the honour of the discovery of the southernmost known land which had been nobly won, and for more than twenty years possessed, by Russia. Continuing our course towards this land for many hours, we seemed scarcely to approach it. It rose in lofty...
Side 166 - We were now within half a mile of the range of bergs. The roar of the surf, which extended each way as far as we could see, and the crashing of the ice, fell upon the ear with fearful distinctness, whilst the frequently averted eye as immediately returned to contemplate the awful destruction that threatened in one short hour to close the world, and all its hopes and joys and sorrows, upon us for ever. In this our deep distress we called upon the Lord, and He heard our voices out of His temple, and...
Side 46 - Ninety-seven ice hills were distinctly seen within the field, besides those on the outside; many of them very large, and looking like a ridge of mountains, rising one above another till they were lost in the clouds.
Side 46 - The sheaves also were frozen so fast in the blocks, that it required our utmost efforts to get a topsail down and up ; the cold so intense as hardly to be endured ; the whole sea, in a manner covered with ice ; a hard gale, and a thick fog.
Side 188 - ... mainsail; but no sooner was the order given, than the daring spirit of the British seaman manifested itself — the men ran up the rigging with as much alacrity as on any ordinary occasion; and although more than once driven off the yard, they after a short time succeeded in loosing the sail. Amidst the roar of the wind and sea it was difficult both to hear and to execute the orders that were given, so that it was...
Side 147 - ... feet above the level of the sea, perfectly flat and level at the top, and without any fissures or promontories on its even seaward face. What was beyond it we could not imagine ; for, being much higher than our mast-head, we could not see anything except the summit of a lofty range of mountains extending to the southward as far as the 79th degree of latitude.
Side 156 - I felt myself compelled to abandon the perhaps too ambitious hope I had so long cherished, of being permitted to plant the flag of my country on both the magnetic poles of our globe...
Side 52 - that Sandwich Land was either a group . of islands, or else a point of the continent, for I firmly believe 'that there is a tract of land near the. Pole, which is the source of -most of the ice which is spread over this vast southern ocean.
Side 53 - ... that can render navigation dangerous, must be encountered, and these difficulties are greatly heightened by the inexpressibly horrid aspect of the country; a country doomed by nature never once to feel the warmth of the sun's rays, but to lie buried in everlasting snow and ice. The ports which may be on the coast, are, in a manner, wholly filled up with frozen snow of vast thickness ; but if any...
Side 140 - We saw not the smallest appearance of vegetation, but inconceivable myriads of penguins completely and densely covered the whole surface of the island, along the ledges of the precipices, and even to the summits of the hills, attacking us vigorously as we waded through their ranks, and pecking at us with their sharp beaks, disputing possession ; which, together with their loud coarse notes, and the insupportable stench from the deep bed of guano, which had been forming for ages, and which may at...

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