The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volum 2

Forside

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 264 - O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
Side 193 - The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, Before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, From the beginning, Or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; When there were no fountains abounding with water.
Side 8 - We are at present qualified to view the advantageous position of Constantinople ; which appears to have been formed by nature for the centre and capital of a great monarchy. Situated in the forty-first degree of latitude, the imperial city commanded from her seven hills...
Side 158 - Every event, or appearance, or accident, which seems to deviate from the ordinary course of nature, has been rashly ascribed to the immediate action of the Deity; and the astonished fancy of the multitude...
Side 33 - The noble art, which had once been preserved as the sacred inheritance of the patricians, was fallen into the hands of freedmen and plebians, who, with cunning rather than with skill, exercised a sordid and pernicious trade. Some of them procured admittance into families for the purpose of fomenting differences, of encouraging suits, and of preparing a harvest of gain for themselves or their brethren. Others, recluse in their chambers, maintained the...
Side 8 - Scythia, as far as the sources of the Tanais and the Borysthenes; whatsoever was manufactured by the skill of Europe or Asia; the corn of Egypt, and the gems and spices of the farthest India, were brought by the varying winds into the port of Constantinople, which, for many ages, attracted the commerce of the ancient world.
Side 14 - A particular description, composed about a century after its foundation, enumerates a capitol or school of learning, a circus, two theatres, eight public, and one hundred and fiftythree private, baths, fifty-two porticoes, five granaries, eight aqueducts or reservoirs of water, four spacious halls for the meetings of the senate or courts of justice, fourteen churches, fourteen palaces, and four thousand three hundred and eightyeight houses, which, for their size or beauty, deserved to be distinguished...
Side 5 - The curve which it describes might be compared to the horn of a stag, or, as it should seem, with more propriety, to that of an ox. The epithet of golden was expressive of the riches which every wind wafted from the most distant countries into the secure and capacious port of Constantinople.
Side 313 - ... that the men who exalt the merit of implicit faith are unfit to claim or to enjoy the advantages of science ; and he vainly contends, that if they refuse to adore the gods of Homer and Demosthenes, they ought to content themselves with expounding Luke and Matthew in the churches of the...
Side 387 - Valentinian bestowed on his brother the rich prefecture of the East, from the lower Danube to the confines of Persia ; whilst he reserved for his immediate government the warlike prefectures of Illyricum, Italy, and Gaul, from the extremity of Greece to the Caledonian rampart ; and from the rampart of Caledonia to the foot of Mount Atlas.

Bibliografisk informasjon