The Letters of Junius

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J. Wheble, in Pater-Noster Row, 1770 - 247 sider
 

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Side 79 - With what force, my lord, with what protection are you prepared to meet the united detestation of the people of England ? The city of London has given a generous example to the kingdom in what manner a king of this country ought to be...
Side 65 - First lived and died a hypocrite. Charles the Second was a hypocrite of another sort, and should have died upon the same scaffold. At the distance of a century, we see their different characters happily revived, and blended in your grace. Sullen and severe without religion, profligate without gaiety, you live like Charles the Second, without being an amiable companion, and, for aught I know, may die as his father did, without the reputation of a martyr.
Side 116 - ... to mankind. We may trace it in the veneration of your country, the choice of your friends, and in the accomplishment of every sanguine hope which the public might have conceived from the illustrious name of Russell. The eminence of your station gave you a commanding prospect of your duty.
Side 165 - SIR, IT is the misfortune of your life, and originally the cause of every reproach and distress, which has attended your government...
Side 166 - They did not wait to examine your conduct, nor to be determined by experience, but gave you a generous credit for the future blessings of your reign, and paid you in advance the dearest tribute of their affections.
Side 75 - Since the accession of our most gracious Sovereign to the throne, we have seen a system of government, which may well be called a reign of experiments.
Side 183 - Without consulting your minister, call together your whole council. Let it appear to the public that you can determine and act for yourself. Come forward to your people. Lay aside the wretched formalities of a king, and speak to your subjects with the spirit of a man, and in the language of a gentleman. Tell them you have been fatally deceived.
Side 76 - ... before he happily arrived at the caput mortuum of vitriol in your Grace. Flat and insipid in your retired state, but brought into action, you become vitriol again. Such are the extremes of alternate indolence or fury, which have governed your whole administration.
Side 185 - The Prince who imitates their conduct, should be warned by their example; and while he plumes himself upon the security of his title to the crown, should remember that, as it was acquired by one revolution, it may be lost by another.
Side 171 - The circumstances to which you are reduced will not admit of a compromise with the English nation. Undecisive...

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