Essays on suicide and the immortality of the soul. With remarks by the editor. To which are added two letters on suicide, from Rousseau's Eloisa. [Followed by] On the immortality of the soul, and a future state, by mr. Addison

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Side 111 - The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me : But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a Power above us, — And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works, — He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.
Side 113 - ... is all Nature cries aloud Through all her works). He must delight in virtue ; And that which He delights in must be happy. But when ? or where ? This world was made for Caesar — I'm weary of conjectures — this must end them.
Side 77 - But can we believe a thinking being, that is in a perpetual progress of improvements, and travelling on from perfection to perfection, after having just looked abroad into the works of its Creator, and made a few discoveries of his infinite goodness, wisdom, and power, must perish at her first setting out, and in the very beginning of her inquiries?
Side 115 - Eye hath not seen, nor Ear heard, neither hath it entered into the Heart of Man, to conceive the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.
Side 77 - Being, whose justice, goodness, wisdom, and veracity, are all concerned in this great point. But among these and other excellent arguments for the immortality of the soul, there is one drawn from the perpetual progress...
Side 80 - With what astonishment and veneration may we look into our own souls, where there are such hidden stores of virtue and knowledge, such inexhausted sources of perfection ? We know not yet what we shall be, nor will it ever enter into the heart of man to conceive the glory that will be always in reserve for him.
Side 77 - A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass in a few years ; he has all the endowments he is capable of, and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Side 79 - Would he give us talents that are not to be exerted? capacities that are never to be gratified?
Side 98 - ... as it generally happens, that virtue would make us more happy even in this life than a contrary...
Side 111 - Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread and inward horror Of falling into...

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