Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

THE EARLY INSCRIBED

AND

SCULPTURED STONES OF WALES,

DELINEATED AND DESCRIBED

BY

J. 0. WESTWOOD, M. A., F. L. S.,

PRESIDENT OF THE ARCHITECTURAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF OXFORD,

HOPE PROFESSOR OF 200LOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OP OXFORD,
VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE CAMBRIAN ARCHÆOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION,

HON. MEMBER OF THE ROYAL IRISI ACADEMY, ETC.

Oxford:
PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS,

FOR THE CAMBRIAN ARCHÆOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION.

1876-1879.

[blocks in formation]

PREFACE.

The object of this work is to bring together into one volume descriptions and figures of all the early Inscribed and Sculptured Stones scattered throughout the Principality of Wales.

It is now thirty-five years since I commenced the search for these venerable relics of ancient times. The investigation of their palæographical and ornamental peculiarities originated in the desire to discover how far many of them, which tradition had connected with the early British Church, agreed with the styles employed in and corroborated the dates given to the earliest religious MSS. known to have been executed in these countries. To these it had been usual, previously, to give the name of Anglo-Saxon or Runic, but which on examination of the MSS. of Ireland (published in my Palæographia Sacra Pictoria) had proved to be of Celtic rather than of Teutonic origin. Sharon Turner's · Vindication of the Genuineness of the Ancient British Poems, published in the Appendix to his ‘History of the Anglo-Saxons,'had further incited my curiosity in the same direction, whilst the establishment of the Cambrian Archäological Association and the commencement of the Archæologia Cambrensis' in 1846, afforded greater facilities of research than could otherwise have been maintained, and on which the labours of the late Reverend H. Longueville Jones were especially developed. The last-named publication, conducted from the first on the genuine principles of archæological enquiry (so totally distinct from the dreamy lucubrations of preceding ages), has during the thirty-three years of its existence brought to light a large number of the ancient Stones of Wales, and it is with pride that I look back to the first volume of that work as containing palæographical articles by myself on the Psalter of Rhyddmarch, Bishop of St. David's, on the Hiberno-Saxon and Welsh peculiarities of the letter M, and the first announcement of Oghams in Wales, given in my account of the Kenfig Stone. I may also, perhaps, be pardonably allowed to refer to the numerous monuments for the first time recorded in this work, of which both the first and last pages contain instances.

The Cambrian Archæological Association having long since urged the publication of a general work embracing the whole of the early Carved and Inscribed Stones of Wales, it was at length resolved to issue it as a supplementary work to the ‘Archæologia Cambrensis,' in annual parts, similar to the work on the Irish Inscriptions issued as the annual supplemental volumes of

« ForrigeFortsett »