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Had I not been sick of marriage and the nuptial torch, to this one frailty I might perhaps give way.

In the meantime, Dædalus, growing weary of Crete and his long exile, and touched by the love of his native soil, was shut up by the sea.

[There was] a piny wood by me many years beloved; it was a wood on a lofty mountain, embowered with gloomy firs, and the maples' shady boughs, whither they brought me sacred oiFernm CfS. - •

Reflect daily [that] thou shouldest resist anger. 1 am transported with the desire of seeing your fathers.

Nor have I now any hope of seeing my ancient country, nor my pleas:ng children, and my much beloved sire.

I shall not see the proud seats of the Myrmidons and Dolopians, nor will go to serve the Greciam dames.

He had come either to besiege thy house, or had laid snares for the senate.

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A direful pestilence fell [on my] anger of unjust Juno, hating (a rival dictas a pellice terras). (He

people (plur.) [from] the

country named from her

frequents colit) the pools

and,spreading lakes, and, hating fire, selected the rivers con

trary to flames (to dwell in quæ colat). Demetrius, weary of a private though opulent life,

mothers.

Wars detested by

privately tacitus) meditates flight into the kingdom. For in] a short time after, hating Agathöcles, his son, whom he

*

had appointed (as successor in successiónem) of [his] kingdom, by whom he had prosperously carried on many wars, not only (beyond what is usual with a father, but with other men patrium verùm etiam humänum ultra morem), (destroyed

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We must carefully turn away from them. The other [accusers] must not only not be pardoned, but they must be opposed vigorously. Nor indeed are they to be regarded, who will advance that we should be very angry with our enemies, and will judge this to be [the part] of a braye and heroic spirit. We must take care, lest the punishment be greater than the crime ; and lest some be questioned only, and others punished for the same misdemeanors. We should take care that the appetites may be obedient to reaY

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son, neither should they run before it, nor through sloth and heaviness disregard it : and the mind should be tranquil, and free from all disturbance.

The Gcrund

Upon which account these men, being fond of war, were affected with great grief. But there is one time for soliciting, another for prosecuting.

He has those accusers, who [have] not [been prompted] to this impeachment by the grudge of [personal] resentments, but who have been drawn imto these resentments by their zeal for impeaching.

Servius here embarked with me in t e city warfare of giving opinioas, pleading causes, and drawing contracts, [a business] full of perplexity and vexation. ,

This they the more easily performed a great part of the summer. Because our ships were kept back by storms, and the danger of sailing was very great in the vast and open sea, in high tides, and where there were few or no ports.

que acc. neque præcurro pres. suljj. nec propter pigritia, aut ignavia deséro: sumque pres. subj. tranquillus, atque omnis perturbatio animus plur. careo. in di. Quis de causa homo, bello cupidus, magnus dolor afficio impf. Sed alius tempus sum peto, alius perséquor. ` Habeo is accusátor, non qui odium inimicitia ad (accusandum), sed qui studium accüso ad inimicitia descendo impf.

subj.

Servius hic sequor ego cum hic turbänus militia acc. respondeo, scribo, caveo, plenus fem. acc. solicitüdo ac stomächus.

Hic neut. (eo) facilè comp. facio impf. magnus pars acc. aestas. Quòd noster navis tempestas detimeo, impf, summusque difficultas , navigo sum impf. vastus atque apertus mare, magnus æstus, rarus abl. ac propè nullus portus abl.

The ger. in do dat, and all; and in dum.

Nature has given the frogs legs adapted to swimming.

This is common to study and writing, that a good state of

Natüra do rana crus aptus natandum.

Hic sum commünis edisco et scribo, quòd bo

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graceful in persuading, and [come] from the schools accomplished and polite. The short time of our existence is long enough to , live well. Aspis prepares the Pisidians, with those whom he had "with % him, for a resistance. , It is not to be wondered at, if, * upon behaving himself thus, both his life w»s secure, and his death afflictiu.;. They began by railing at the senate. to incense the common people, then by being prodigal, and by promising, to inflame them the more. Thus being superior in number, ifthey could not check the

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Minimè sum (mirandum), sui gero, si et vita is sum perf. secürus et mors acerbus.

Cœpi senätus criminor, plebs exagito, dein largior atque polliceor magis incendo.

Ita numérus prior, si a perséquor hostis deterreo nequeo plupf. disjectus acc. plur. ab tergum , aut circumVemlO

Qui modus tu sum perf. frumentum (aestimandi ?) Unus sum consul, et is non in administro bellum, sed in sufficio collèga occupâ- ' tus. '

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parätus ad dimico animus, ut, non modò ad insigne accommödo, sed etiam ad galea induo, scutumque tegmentum deträho, tempus desum perf. subj. (Quam quisque) in pars acc. ab opus casus abl. devenio, quisque signum primus neut. plur. conspicio; ad hic consto; ne, in quæro suus, pugno tempus dimitto.

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