A Review of the Evidence Taken Before a Committee of the House of Commons in Relation to the State of Education in Manchester and Salford

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J. Snow, 1852 - 116 sider
 

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Side 104 - ... to impress on the minds of children and youth committed to their care and instruction the principles of piety and justice and a sacred regard to truth ; love of their country, humanity, and universal benevolence; sobriety, industry, and frugality; chastity, moderation, and temperance ; and those other virtues which are the ornament of human society and the basis upon which a republican Constitution is founded...
Side 106 - Because it is highly important for the security of society in all free countries, and most so in the freest, that the children of all sects, classes, and conditions, since they must mingle together subsequently in the conflicts of life, should from their earliest years be intimately associated in similar pursuits i as they are in school) on terms of perfect equality...
Side 107 - ... parents, after the church service on Sunday, to instruct their children by hearing them repeat the Lord's prayer, the Ten Commandments, the Creed, and to read to them from the Bible and other religious works. This custom is, I am led to believe, to a great extent discontinued ; and, as a substitute, it is almost uniformly the case that the various denominations have connected with their society and places of worship Sunday schools. The system of Sunday schools, says Mr. Hillard, which is universal...
Side 75 - Let the tax-gatherer, or the county-assessor, or the parish collector, but once go his rounds for a school-rate, and I will answer for it, that the voluntary assistance of men in themselves benevolent, and, indeed, munificent, instead of increasing, will soon vanish away; that the 1,144,000 now educated at unendowed schools will speedily fall down to almost nothing ; and that the adoption of such a fatal and heedless course will sweep away those establishments which, at present, reflect so much honour...
Side 106 - I believe the system of the free schools of New England to be a wise system of moral police, to support which the property of all is rightfully taxed ; and I will add. — having lived two or three years in Germany, and longer in other parts of Europe — that I believe this New England system to be more effectual than any system of teaching has yet been made elsewhere to secure the well-being of a State. And, further, that such a persuasion of the inherent benefits of our free schools is the settled...
Side 107 - England, it was generally the custom for parents, after the church service on Sunday, to instruct their children by hearing them repeat the Lord's Prayer, the Ten Commandments, the Creed, and to read to them from the Bible and other religious works. This custom is, I am led to believe, to a great extent discontinued; and, as a substitute, it is almost uniformly the case that the various denominations have connected with their society and place of worship Sunday schools.
Side 98 - J.Russell did not often attend the meetings of the Committee, nor did he pay any great attention to its proceedings when he was there ; the few questions which he asked showed him to be entrenched in a set of previously formed notions, which he had no intention to relinquish. The position of the Chairman, Mr.
Side 107 - For the last thirty years," says Mr. Ticknor, " Sunday schools have been increasing in numbers, until now hardly a congregation in New England is without one." Very good. This extensive institution and sedulous cultivation of Sunday schools is a clear proof that they were wanted, and that the common schools were not schools of piety, but that they practically abandoned religious instruction and culture to such chances as might arise. And to...
Side 48 - Men's minds seem more prepared than I ever remember before, nay, even anxious, for some great development of the present meagre and tantalizing state of popular education. It is felt, that very much effort is made for a small result. The clergy make great sacrifices of money and time ; and what is more, enact the part of mendicant friars...
Side 85 - 2. That the sole object of this society shall be to instruct and educate the poor in suitable learning, works of industry, and the principles of the Christian religion, according to the Established Church.

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