Southey's common-place book. Ed. by J.W. Warter, Volum 2

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Side 37 - And before the throne there was a sea of glass like unto crystal: and in the midst of the throne and round about the throne were four beasts full of eyes before and behind.
Side 70 - And when he putteth forth his own sheep he goeth before them, and the sheep follow him ; for they know his voice. And a stranger will they not follow, but will flee from him; for they know not the voice of strangers.
Side 67 - Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him.
Side 546 - WOE to thee that spoilest, and thou wast not spoiled ; And dealest treacherously, and they dealt not treacherously with thee ! When thou shalt cease to spoil, thou shalt be spoiled ; And when thou shalt make an end to deal treacherously, they shall deal treacherously with thee.
Side 94 - When they went from one nation to another, from one kingdom to another people; He suffered no man to do them wrong: yea, he reproved kings for their sakes; Saying, Touch not mine anointed, and do my prophets no harm.
Side 295 - In my time my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot as to learn (me) any other thing ; and so, I think, other men did their children. He taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms, as other nations do, but with strength of the body.
Side 293 - But London was never so ill as it is now. In times past men were full of pity and compassion, but now there is no pity; for in London their brother shall die in the streets for cold, he shall lie sick at the door between stock and stock, I cannot tell what to call it, and perish there for hunger: was there ever more unmercifulness in Nebo?
Side 292 - My father was a yeoman, and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of three or four pound by year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep; and my mother milked thirty kine.
Side 299 - Because they will be merry. Then wherefore in these merry days Should we, I pray, be duller ? No, let us sing some roundelays, To make our mirth the fuller. And, whilst thus inspired we sing, Let all the streets with echoes ring, Woods and hills, and everything, Bear witness we are merry.
Side 20 - Ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Ghost: as your fathers did, so do ye.

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