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years; or (sixth) in the course of the proceedings in bankruptcy refused to obey any lawful order of or to answer any material question approved by the court: Provided, That a trustee shall not interpose objections to a bankrupt's discharge until he shall be authorized so to do at a meeting of creditors called for that purpose. The court or referee may, in its discretion, permit the specification of objections to the discharge to be amended at any time, either in substance or by setting forth of additional objections to such discharge.

"(c) The confirmation of a composition shall discharge the bankrupt from his debts other than those agreed to be paid by the terms of the composition and those not affected by a discharge."

SEC. 2.

That this act shall take effect immediately.

EXHIBIT H.

63D CONGRESS, 1ST SESSION. H. R. 5894.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

JUNE 6, 1913.

Mr. Dent introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary and ordered to be printed.

A BILL

TO AMEND AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF BANKRUPTCY THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section seventeen of the act of July first, eighteen hundred and ninetyeight, as amended by the act of February fifth, nineteen hundred and three, and as further amended by the act of June twentyfifth, nineteen hundred and ten, entitled "An act to establish a uniform system of bankruptcy throughout the United States," be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to add to section seventeen the following additional exception to the effect of a discharge in bankruptcy, which shall be known as subdivision numbered

five, of said section seventeen, to wit: "Or any debt created for the necessaries of life within six months prior to the institution of bankruptcy proceedings, whether the same be voluntary or involuntary."

EXHIBIT I.

63D CONGRESS, 1ST SESSION. H. R. 4301.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

APRIL 25, 1913.

Mr. Byrnes of South Carolina introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary and ordered to be printed.

A BILL

TO AMEND SECTION FIFTY-SEVEN, SUBSECTION N, OF THE ACT TO ESTABLISH A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF BANKRUPTCY THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES, APPROVED JULY FIRST, EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section fifty-seven, subsection n, of the act to establish a uniform system of bankruptcy throughout the United States, approved July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, be, and it is hereby, amended by adding thereto, at the end of said subsection, the following:

"Provided, That the judge, at any time before final distribution in any case, shall, upon hearing, after such notice to the trustee as the judge may deem reasonable, allow proof of claims to be made after such period of one year if the judge shall, upon such hearing, find that it will not unreasonably delay the distribution next to be made."

REPORT

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL LAW.

To the American Bar Association:

Your Standing Committee on International Law respectfully submits its annual report. It aims, as is customary, to briefly collate the treaties negotiated, confirmed or proclaimed by the United States and the principal international incidents affecting her relations since the preceding report presented in 1912. The arrangement is chronological.

HONDURAS UNITED STATES.

1912, July 10.-Ratifications were exchanged at Washington of an extradition convention signed at Washington, January 15, 1909, between Honduras and the United States.

Am. J. Inter. L. Vol. 6, p. 989.
U. S. Treaty Ser. No. 569.

1912, July 11 and again July 13.-Great Britain protested against the provisions in the Panama Canal Bill which would permit American ships to use the canal free of tolls and which bar railroad-owned ships from the canal.

1912, July 12.-The International Radio Telegraph Convention was signed at London by the United States with the principal powers of both continents.

1912, July 19.-An International Commission of American Jurists met at Rio de Janeiro to draft codes of public and private international law.

Am. J. Inter. L. Vol. 7, p. 171.
Mem. Dipl. 50, 466.

GREAT BRITAIN-UNITED STATES.

1912, July 20.-An agreement was signed adopting rules and method of procedure for the settlement of questions regarding

the exercise of fishing liberties referred to in Article 1 of the treaty of October 20, 1818, between Great Britain and the United States.

Am. J. Inter. L. Vol. 6, p. 989.
Cong. Rec. Aug. 1, 1912.

1912, July 27.-An agreement was reached in the dispute between Mexico and the United States over the boundary near El Paso, the land in dispute to be purchased by the United States. R. of Rs. Vol. 46 p. 297.

1912, August 24.-President Taft signed the Act of Congress "to provide for the opening, maintenance, protection and operation of the Panama Canal."

Am. J. I. L. Vol. 6, p. 976.

The measure finally passed provides "No tolls shall be levied upon vessels engaged in the coastwise trade of the United States." (See Sup. Am. J. I. L. Vol. 6, p. 277.) The British Government by its Chargé d'Affaires at Washington made informal protest to the Department of State to this provision, which the Secretary of State by letter of July 12, 1912, communicated to the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Interoceanic Canals. Am. J. Int. L. Vol. 6, p. 980. The communication indicated the opinion of His Britanic Majesty's Government that to exempt all American shipping from the payment of tolls would involve an infraction of the existing treaty and that a refunding of such tolls would not differ in principle.

A protest contained in a note of Sir Edward Grey was presented to Secretary Knox by the Ambassador of Great Britain, Mr. Bryce, December 9, 1912, claiming that the Panama Canal Act violates the following provision of the Hay-Pauncefote treaty: "The canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce and of war of all nations observing these rules, on terms of entire equality, so that there shall be no discrimination against any such nation, or its citizens, or subjects, in respect of the conditions or charges of traffic, or otherwise. Such conditions and charges of traffic shall be just and equitable." The violations alleged are:

1. In assuming that the words "all nations" in the above provision mean "all other nations."

2. In ignoring the undertaking that the "charges of traffic shall be just and equitable."

See Am. J. Inter. L. Vol. 7, p. 21.

Article by J. H.

Latiné.

Sup. Am. J. Inter. L. Vol. 7, pp. 46-58.

The communication intimates that there might be no objection if the regulations could give assurance that only vessels engaged in bona fide coastwise traffic could enjoy the exemption, but believes such adequate regulations impossible to be framed.

President Taft in signing the bill accompanied it by a memorandum, answering these objections and claiming that, as the United States enjoys absolute rights of ownership and control over the canal, this included the right to allow its own commerce the use of the canal upon such terms as it sees fit and that the language of the Hay-Pauncefote treaty merely indicated a neutralizing of the canal so that no discriminations should be made against the commerce of any nation and was not intended to hamper the United States in dealing with its own commerce.

1912, August 4.-A detachment of American sailors and marines was landed near Managua, Nicaragua, to protect American citizens during the revolution.

R. of Rs. Vol. 46, p. 271.

1912, August 27.-200 American sailors and marines landed at Corinto and forced their way to Leon and Managua through territory held by the revolutionists.

R. of Rs. Vol. 46, p. 419.

1912, September 16.-The ratifications of the copyright treaty signed at Budapest, January 30, 1912, between Hungary and the United States were exchanged at Washington.

1912, September 17.-The United States informed the Nicaraguan Government that it would not countenance the actions of General Mena and would lend strong moral support to the cause of good government.

1912, September 20.-The American forces in Nicaragua reached Granada and relieved the city from danger of famine.

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