Transactions of the Glasgow Archaeological Society, Volum 2

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The Society, 1896

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Side 257 - Lest haply after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish it, all that behold it begin to mock him, saying, This man began to build, and was not able to finish.
Side 84 - English, determined upon, viz., that the temples of the idols in that nation ought not to be destroyed ; but let the idols that are in them be destroyed ; let holy water be made and sprinkled in the said temples, let altars be erected, and relics placed.
Side 408 - ... sculptured shapeliness for a time insuperable, connects forgotten and following ages with each other, and half constitutes the identity, as it concentrates the sympathy, of nations ; — it is in that golden stain of time that we are to look for the real light and...
Side 408 - Age, and in that deep sense of voicefulness, of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity. It is in their lasting witness against men, in their quiet contrast with the transitional character of all things, in the strength which, through the lapse of seasons and times, and the decline and birth of dynasties, and the changing of the face of the earth, and of the limits of the sea,...
Side 243 - And entering into the house they found the child with Mary, his mother, and falling down they adored him; and opening their treasures they offered him gifts : gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
Side 61 - The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard-seed, which a man took and sowed in his field : which is the least indeed of all seeds ; but when it is grown up, it is greater than all herbs, and becometh a tree ; so that the birds of the air come, and dwell in the branches thereof.
Side 457 - The Kentish men of old were said to have tails, because trafficking in the Low Countries, they never paid full payments of what they did owe, but still left some part unpaid.
Side 30 - All that Mr. Baker printed was, 1. " Reflections on Learning, shewing the insufficiency thereof in its several particulars, in order to evince the usefulness and necessity of Revelation, London, 1710," which went through eight editions; and Mr. Boswell, in his
Side 408 - For, indeed, the greatest glory of a building is not in its stones, nor in its gold. Its glory is in its Age, and in that deep sense of voicefulness, of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity.
Side 95 - And shattered Memnon yields a magic sound, Set up a glittering brute of uncouth shape, And bow before the image of an ape ! Thousands regard the hound with holy fear, Not...

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