Mississippi State Cases: Being Criminal Cases Decided in the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and in the Supreme Court, of the State of Mississippi : from the June Term 1818 to the First Monday in January 1872, Inclusive, Volum 2

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Side 1222 - And these may be reduced to three principal or primary articles ; the right of personal security, the right of personal liberty and the right of private property...
Side 1736 - That the framers of the constitution did not intend to restrain the States in the regulation of their civil institutions, adopted for internal government, and that the instrument they have given us is not to be so construed, may be admitted.
Side 1183 - We think, that in all cases of this nature, the law has invested Courts of justice with the authority to discharge a jury from giving any verdict, whenever, in their opinion, taking all the circumstances into consideration, there is a manifest necessity for the act, or "the ends of public justice would otherwise be defeated.
Side 1817 - Columbia, laborer, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil...
Side 1183 - ... manifest necessity for the act, or the ends of public justice would otherwise be defeated. They are to exercise a sound discretion on the subject; and it is impossible to define all the circumstances, which would render it proper to interfere. To be sure, the power ought to be used with the greatest caution, under urgent circumstances, and for very plain and obvious causes; and in capital cases especially, courts should be extremely careful how they interfere with any of the chances of life,...
Side 1370 - An assault is any attempt or offer, with force or violence, to do a corporal hurt to another...
Side 1786 - French, did then and there feloniously and willfully kill, contrary to the form of the statute in such case made and provided, and against the peace of the people of the state of New York and their dignity.
Side 1651 - And thus far, touching the forms of indictment, wherein generally we are to take notice that in favour of life great strictnesses have been in all times required in points of indictments, and the truth is, that it is grown to be a blemish and inconvenience in the law, and the administration thereof; more offenders escape by the over-easy ear given to exceptions in indictments, than by their own innocence...
Side 1430 - In every charge of murder, the fact of killing being first proved, all the circumstances of accident, necessity, or infirmity, are to be satisfactorily proved by the prisoner, unless they arise out of the evidence produced against him; for the law presumeth the fact to have been founded in malice, until the contrary appeareth.
Side 1922 - Express malice is when one, with a sedate deliberate mind and formed design, doth kill another : which formed design is evidenced by external circumstances discovering that inward intention; as lying in wait, antecedent menaces, former grudges, and concerted schemes to do him some bodily harm.

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