Remarks, on the first part of a book, entitled 'The age of reason', addressed to Thomas Paine, its author

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Side 54 - And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, And prevailed not; neither was their place found any more in heaven. And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.
Side 31 - What presence of mind, — what subtilty, — what truth in his replies ! How great the command over his passions ! Where is the man, — where the philosopher who could so live, and so die, without weakness and without ostentation...
Side 30 - I will confess to you," — this is a man who had no faith in Christianity at all, — "I will confess to you that the majesty of the Scriptures strikes me with admiration, as the purity of the Gospel hath its influence on my heart. Peruse the works of our philosophers, with all their pomp of diction ; how mean, how contemptible are they, compared with the Scriptures ! Is it possible that a book at once so simple and sublime should be merely the work of man ? Is it possible that the sacred personage,...
Side 66 - Whenever we read the obscene stories, the voluptuous debaucheries, the cruel and torturous executions, the unrelenting vindictiveness, with which more than half the Bible is filled, it would be more consistent that we called it the word of a demon, than the word of God. It is a history of wickedness, that has served to corrupt and brutalize mankind...
Side 81 - Moral justice cannot take the innocent for the guilty, even if the innocent would offer itself. To suppose justice to do this is to destroy the principle of its existence, which is the thing itself. It is then no longer justice. It is indiscriminate revenge.
Side 31 - Shall we suppose the evangelic history a mere fiction ? Indeed, my friend, it bears not the marks of fiction ; on the contrary, the history of Socrates, which nobody presumes to doubt, is not so well attested as that of Jesus Christ.
Side 46 - And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thon shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.
Side 95 - Say first, of God above, or man below, What can we reason, but from what we know? Of man, what see we but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer ? Through worlds unnumbered, though the God be known, 'Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Side 31 - The Jewish authors were incapable of the diction, and strangers to the morality contained in the gospel, the marks of whose truth are so striking and inimitable that the inventor would be a more astonishing character than the hero.
Side 54 - How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning ! how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations ! 'for thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God...

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