The History of the United States of America, Volum 4

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Innhold

No Action taken on his Plan for discharging the Public Debt
405
CHAPTER VI
411
Further Cabinet Consultations
417
Remonstrances of Genet
423
Pacificus and Helvidius Jefferson tenders his Resignation
429
Reaction in favor of the Government
435
Conduct of the Colonial Prize Courts
441
Yellow Fever at Philadelphia
447
His Report on CommerceHe retires to Monticello
454
Madisons ResolutionsDebate thereon
461
Economical and Political Character of the Resolutions
476
British Order in Council of Nov 6th 1793
481
Jayhis Nomination as Extraordinary Envoy
488
Abolition Convention Restraints on the Slave Trade
494
Meeting at Mingo Creek
500
First Convention at Parkinsons Ferry
506
Prompt Response to the Presidents Requisition
510
The Government strengthened by it
516
Second Session of the Third Congress Private Claims
523
Dissatisfaction of Jefferson at the Tameness of the Opposition
529
Provision for the Redemption of the Public Debt
536
Special Session of the Senatenew Members
544
Publication of the Treaty
546
At Wilmington and elsewhere
552
Continued public Excitement
561
Attempt to convert the Foreign into Domestic Debt
568
Organization of the National Bank 279
574
Land Speculationalleged Attempt at Bribery
580
Cabinet Consultation Presidents Refusal
587
Movements out of Doors
597
Speech of Gallatin
604
The Treaty sustained
615
Contrariety of their Opinions
621
Impressment Poor Debtors
627
Progress and Prosperity of New England
634
Delaware New Jersey Maryland Southern States
640
Morris his Recall
646
Disapproval by the American Government
653
Acts and Promises of the French Government Jays Treaty
659

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Side 678 - ... constantly keeping in view that it is folly in one nation to look for disinterested favors from another; that it must pay with a portion of its independence for whatever it may accept under that character; that by such acceptance it may place itself in the condition of having given equivalents for nominal favors, and yet of being reproached with ingratitude for not giving more. There can be no greater error than to expect or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation. It is an illusion...
Side 267 - I do believe in one God, the Creator and Governor of the Universe, the rewarder of the good and the punisher of the wicked. And I do acknowledge the scriptures of the old and new testament to be given by divine inspiration...
Side 174 - The Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully held in Bondage, and for Improving the Condition of the African Race," incorporated by Act of Assembly passed the 8th day of December, AD 1789, of which Dr.
Side 609 - In place of that noble love of liberty and republican government which carried us triumphantly through the war, an Anglican monarchical and aristocratical party has sprung up, whose avowed object is to draw over us the substance, as they have already done the forms, of the British Government.
Side 580 - As, therefore, it is perfectly clear to my understanding, that the assent of the House of Representatives is not necessary to the validity of a treaty ; as the treaty with Great Britain exhibits, in itself, all the objects requiring legislative provision, and on these the papers called for can throw no light ; and as it is essential to the due administration of the government, that the boundaries, fixed by the constitution between the different departments, should be preserved; a just regard to the...
Side 57 - On the other hand, the magnitude and difficulty of the trust to which the voice of my country called me, being sufficient to awaken in the wisest and most experienced of her citizens a distrustful scrutiny into his qualifications, could not but overwhelm with despondence one who (inheriting inferior endowments from nature and unpracticed in the duties of civil administration) ought to be peculiarly conscious of his own deficiencies.
Side 357 - I was duped into by the Secretary of the Treasury, and made a tool for forwarding his schemes, not then sufficiently understood by me ; and, of all the errors of my political life, this has occasioned me the deepest regret.
Side 198 - ... all men are created equal; and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; and that among these are, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...
Side 358 - I acknowledge and avow; and this was not merely a speculative difference. His system flowed from principles adverse to liberty, and was calculated to undermine and demolish the republic, by creating an influence of his department over members of the legislature.
Side 176 - ... devise means for removing this inconsistency from the character of the American people...

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