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Pago

ib.

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20,21

ib.

Lord Percy

Put in the stocks for drunkenness after
being rector

3
His after resentment of that insult
Is made one of the chaplains to Henry
the Seventh

4
Employed to negotiate a marriage between

the king and the Duchess of Savoy ib.
Installed into the Deanery of Lincoln in
1508

5
Death of Henry the Seventh in 1509

ib.
Wolsey appointed privy councillor to Henry
the Eighth

ib.
Character of Henry the Eighth in his early

years
State of Europe on the accession of that
monarch

7
Henry's invasion of France

ib.
Wolsey made Bishop of Tournay

8
made Bishop of Lincoln ib.
made Archbishop of York ib.
raised to the dignity of cardinal 9

made chancellor of England ib.
He receives annual bribes from foreign
powers

10
Account of his enormous income and ex-
penditure :

11, 12
His extravagant banquets

13
Immense power exercised by the cardinal
as chancellor

15
He erects courts to protect the poor against
the rich

ib.
Equity of his decisions as a judge ib.
Receives the appointinent of the Pope's
legate

17
The bishops offended at his ecclesiastical
power

ib.

Manner in which that power was exercised 18
Celebrated meeting of Henry and Francis

the First, at the field of Ardres 19, 19
Trial and execution of the Duke of Buck-
ingham, and reflections on that event

19, 20
Part taken by the cardinal in the contro-

versy between Henry and Luther
His exertions in the cause of learning 22
He applies the funds of the suppressed

monasteries to the institution of schools 23
He founded the college of Christ Church,
Oxford, in 1525

24
Particulars respecting Anne Boleyn and

25, 26
He visits France on account of the impri-

sonment of Pope Clement the Seventh 26
His conduct respecting the divorce of Queen

Catharine and the King's marriage with
Anne Boleyn

28-30
Information exhibited against him by the
King's Attorney-General

32
Receives the king's pardon, and is rein-

stated in the sees of York and Win-
chester

jՆ.
Bill of attainder presented against him by

the Star Chamber for high treason 32, 33
The bill passes the Lords but is thrown out
by the Commons

34
Arrested for treason, and carried to Lon-
don for trial

36
His superstitious fear on hearing the name
of Kingston

37
Dies at Leicester, on his journey to London 38
Summary of his personal and political cha-
racter

38-40

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LIFE OF COKE,

Coke's birth and parentage (1550). 1
Education at Norwich and Cambridge ib.
His law studies in the Inns of Court and
at Westminster Hall

2
Appointed to the office of attorney-general ib.
Elected speaker of the House of Commons
in 1592

ib.
He becomes very rich, and marries, in suc-

cession, two ladies of large property ib.
Is prosecuted, in the Ecclesiastical Court,

on account of the irregularity of his se-
cond marriage

3
Trial of the Earls of Essex and Southamp-

ton, for high treason, and Coke's rude
conduct on that occasion

ib.
His equally intemperate behaviour on the
trial of Raleigh

4
Violeut altercation between Coke and Bacon

Sworn a member of the privy council 7
His objections to the then practice of taking
the private opinions of the judges before

ib.
Particulars of the dispute concerning the

power of the Chancery, and the cele-
brated case of the Commendams

8
Correspondence between the king and the

twelve judges on the subject 9-11
The king reprimands the judge

11
Independence of Coke on that occasion 12
His zealous inquiry relative to the assas-

sination of Sir Thomas Overbury 13
Resentment of the king against him ib.
His consequent disgrace and dismissal

froin his place of chief justice 14
Marriage of Coke's daughter with the

brother of the Duke of Buckingham,
and the strong efforts made by Bacon
to prevent it

14-16
Coke restored to his place in the privy
council

16
Violent quarrels between him and his wife

16, 17

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Pago

His independent conduct in Parliament in
opposing the despotism of the crown

17-19
Accession of Charles the First, and his
enmity to Coke

19, 20
Coke chosen a member (in 1628) of that

House of Commons which first resisted
the encroachments of the royal preroga.
tive

20
His excellent speech in that Parliament 20,21
His death in 1634

21
Persoual, judicial, and political character
of Coke

21-23

Page
Critical examination of his works 23-30
His digressions and useless quotations
censured

24, 25
Examples of his constant parade of scho-
lastic pedantry

25-27
His ludicrous reports such as that of the
cock and hen swans

27, 28
His humane observations on capital pu-

nishments
Account of Coke's manuscripts, now in the

possession of Mr. Coke of Norfolk 30-32
List of works which give further informa-

tion concerning Sir Edward Coke 32

28

ib.

.

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LIFE OF LORD SOMERS.
Birth and parentage of Somers (1650). 1 Popular excitement in England upon the
His early education

ib. French king's recognition of the Pre-
Entered at Trinity College, Oxford 2 tender's title

14
Called to the bar

ib. King William's speech at opening his
Political and historical tracts, written by last parliament

15
him while at Oxford

3 Lord Somers excluded from the admini-
Removes to London and attends the stration on the accession of Queen
courts of law
4 Anne

ib.
Trial of the seven bishops

ib. Debates on the bill against occasional
Returned to the first parliament of Wil-

conformity
liam III, for Worcester

5 He encourages the scheme of appropriat-
He is made solicitor-general and knighted ib. ing the First Fruits and Tenths to in-
Conducts the prosecution on the trial of crease the revenues of the poorer clergy 16
Lord Preston, 1691

6 Debates upon the proposal to invite the
Becomes successively attorney-general, Princess Sophia to England

ib,
lord-keeper, and lord chancellor 7 Lord Somers's Bill for the amendment of
He is elected president of the Royal the law

17
Society, 1698
ib. Union with Scotland, 1706

18, 19
His usefulness to the king in the contests His speech in favour of the Bill for
between the Whigs and Tories

abolishing the Scotch privy-council 20
Decline of the Whig administration 8 Returns to administration and takes the
Groundless charges against him in the office of president of the council, in
House of Commons
9 1708

21
Captain Kidd's piracies

ib. Again retires from office,

17io.

ib.
The king persiaded to dismiss him from

Signs a protest against the Schism Act 22
his office

10 On the accession of George I. takes his
Delivers the great seal to

Lord
Jersey, seat in the cabinet council

ib.
1700

11

Discourages the prosecutions against the
Tory administration in October, 1700

partizans of the Pretender

ib.
Charge against Lord Somers respecting Attends in the House of Lorús during
the Partition Treaties

ib. the proceedings on the impeachment
His speech at the bar of the House of

of Lord Derwentwater, in 1716

23
Commons
12 His last illness and death

ib.
He is impeached by the Commons ib. His opinion on the Septennial Bill ib.
Impeachment dismissed by the Lords 13 Scarcity of information respecting Lord
Disposition of the king to recur to Lord Somers's personal history

24
Somers and the Whigs

14 His character by an anonymous contem-
Death of James II. at St. Germains, in

ib.
1701

ib. His judicial and political character 25

ib.

ib.

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The laws of Solon were engraved in wood,
or on stone

3
The laws of the Twelve Tables, among

the Romans, were engraved on oaken
planks

3
The Arundelian marbles, account of ib.
The Parian Chronicle described

ib.
The Roman records were engraved in
brass

ib.
The wills of the Roman soldiers were en-
graved on their shields

ib.
The laws of the Emperors were painted on

wooden tablets, as late as the 4th century 4
The Egyptians painted their letters on
linen

ib.
The Romans also wrote on linen

5
Skins first written upon by the Ionians as
a substitute for papyrus

ib,
The poems of Homer were written on the

intestines of a serpent, in letters of gold ib.
Account of the Gothic manuscript of the
Gospels, by Ulphilas

ib.
Dissertation on the

papyrus
and its different uses

6
Paper from cotton first manufactured in
Europe, in the 8th or 9th century

ib.
Paper from linen not general until the
14th century

7
Reeds originally used, in place of quills,
for making, pens

ib.
were in use for writing as late as
the 8th century, and are still employed
by many eastern nations

8
the species which was the calamus
of the ancients is unknown to modern
botanists

ib.

Page
The ink of the ancients, its composition
and colours

8
Of the copyists of books before the in-
vention of printing

9-13
A system of short-hand, supposed to have
been invented by Xenophon

10
Wages of copyists in England in the 15th
century

11
Booksellers of the Middle Ages 12, 13
Scarcity of books in the 9th and 10th
centuries

14, 15
Public Schools at Rome, when insti-
tuted

16, 17
Playing cards, about the close of the 14th

century, were printed by blocks 18
Printing with moveable metal types dis.

covered at Mayence, by John Guthen-
berg, about the year 1438

19
Origin of the story of Dr. Faustus and
the Devil

20
Dates of the first printed works in dif-
ferent countries

20-22
Birth and parentage of Caxton (1412) 22
He was a citizen of London

ib.
Appointed in 1464, one of the ambassa-

dors to the Duke of Burgundy 22
Caxton learned the art of printing during
his stay in the Low Countries

23
“ Game of Chess," the first book printed

by Caxton, in England, in 1474'. 24
Account of other works published by
(Caxton

25-28
Death of Caxton in 1490-1

28
Sketch of his character

28-30
Notices of British printers who were his
contemporaries

30-32

of Egypt,

.

.

LIFE OF BLAKE.

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Birth and parentage of Blake (1599). 1
His education at Oxford, and disappoint-
ment of a fellowship

1,2
He acquires influence with the Puritan
party

2
Is' elected Member of Parliament for
Bridgewater, in 1640

ib.
Embraces the cause of the Parliament
against Charles the First, in 1642

ib.
Distinguished himself at Bristol, in 1643 3
Served as Lieutenant-Colonel of a regi.

ment of foot, and successfully defended
the town of Lyme

ib,
Appointed Governor of Taunton, by the
Parliament, in 1644

ib.
His brave and obstinate defence of that

place
Reflections on the mischievous doctrines

of divine right, and passive obedience 5
Blake, though a republican, disapproved

of the trial and execution of the king 6
Union of the military and naval service

under the Commonwealth; and the ap-
pointment of Blake to the command of
a squadron ,

7

Blake blockades the royal fleet, in the

harbour of Kinsale
The royal ships effect a passage through

his squadron, after sustaining great loss,
and arrive in the Tagus

ib.
W'ar commences, in consequence, be-
tween England and Portugal

8
Honourable behaviour of Admiral Blake

to the captain of a French ship of war ib.
Blake receives the thanks of Parliament,

and is made warden of the Cinque
sports.

ib.
He reduces the Scilly Isles, and Jersey,

to the subjection of the Commonwealth 9
Causes of the war with the Dutch ; and '

first engagement with Van Tromp 9-12
Blake captures the Dutch convoy in the
North Sea

12
His engagement with and defeat of De
TVitt and De Ruyter

13
Series of engagements with the Dutch
fleet

13-16
Description of the fleets of those times 13
List of the British navy of 1675, with an

account of their guns and tonnage 14

4, 5

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Remarks on Dugald Stewart's Life of Dr.
Smith

1
Birth and parentage of Smith (1723) 2
Was carried off by gipsies when a child ib.
Educated at Kirkaldy until he was 14
years of age

3
Spent 3 years at the university of Glas-
gow before entering at Oxford

ib.
Caught at Oxford in the act of reading

Hume's Treatise on Human Nature ib.
Dr. Smith's subsequent character of
Hume as an author

4
Passed 7 years at Oxford

ib.
Cause of his objections to thať university
in after life

ib.
Ile removed to Edinburgh in 1748, and

formed an intimacy with all the great
men of that metropolis

5
Elected professor of moral philosophy in

the university of Glasgow (1752) 6
Account of his lectures during his 13
years' professorship .

ib.
Establishment of an Edinburgh Review,

in 1755, to which Smith was a contri-

butor
Curious anecdote of Hume concerning
that Review

ib.
Origin of the Select Society of Edinburgh ib.
Publication of the “ Theory of Moral
Sentiments," in 1759

8
Hume's letter to Smith on that occasion 8, 9
Critical observations on the Theory of
Moral Sentiments

9.13

Dr. Smith accompanies the Duke of Buc-
cleugh, in his travels in 1764

14
Interesting circumstances on taking leave
of the university

14, 15
Anecdote related by the Doctor, of one of
his students

15
Smith is introduced to D'Alembert, IIel-

vetius, and other French literati 16
He contracts a close intimacy with Tur-
got and Quesnai

ib.
Particulars concerning his acquaintance
with Rochefoucauld

17
Correspondence between Smith and Hume

17, 18
Publication of the “Wealth of Nations"
(1776)

18
Death of Mr. Hume, and Dr. Smith's de-

fence of his memory against the absurd

calumnies which followed that event 19,20
Critical account of the “ Wealth of Na-
tions”

20,23
Description of the Literary Club in Lon-

don, of which Smith was a member 24
Smith appointed a commissioner of the
customs for Scotland, in 1778

ib.
Correspondence with Lord Kames, con-

cerning the moral theory of Smith 25
Dr. Smith elected rector of the univer.
sity of Glasgow, in 1787

26
His death in July 1790

ib.
Observations on his general characterand
writings

26-32
Anecdote of Johnson respecting him 26

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LIFE OF NIEBUHR.

Natural talents and attainments appre-
ciated

1
His birth and parentage (1733)
Political character of the German literati
at the middle of the last century

ib.
Geographical and Statistical account of

the Province of Friesland, where Nie-
buhr was born.

ib.
His mathematical studies, and difficulties
in pursuing them

3
Character of Bernstorf, the Danish Prime
Minister in 1757

4

Origin and objects of the scientific expe-
dition into Arabia

5-7
Niebuhr proposed as mathematician and
astronomer

5
Studies Arabic under Michaelis

6
Characters of Niebuhr's associates in the
expedition

7,8
The expedition leaves the Sound in 1761 8
Niebuhr attacked by dysentery in the
Archipela o

9
His rule to interfere with no man coucern.
ing religious opinions

ib.

Page

Page

ib.

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The party remain a whole year in Egypt 9
Niebuhr' determines the longitude of

Alexandria, Kahira, and other places,
by lunar observatious

ib.
Anecdote of Turkish ignorance respecting
telescopes

10
Description of the palace of Joseph, at
Kahira

11
Account of the overflow of the Nile 11, 12
Turkish manners and intolerance at Ka-
hira

ib.
Mode of collecting gum-arabic in Egypt 13
Preparation for a journey to Mount Sinai ib.
Goat-skin bottles, how prepared in the East 14
Niebuhr's illness, and death of his asso-
ciates

ib.
His arrival at Bombay, and friendly re-
ception from the English

15
Journey to Persepolis and Persiz 16
Adopts the eastern customs and nanners ib.
Visits Cyprus for the purpose of copying
certain inscriptions

ib.
Character of the Catholic missionaries in
Turkey

16
Niebuhr passes three months at Constan-

tinople on his return homewards 17
His journey through Poland, and acquaint-
ance with Stanislaus

ib.

Reaches Copenhagen in November 1767 17
His subsequent intimacy with Bernstorf,
Klopstock, and others

ib.
Whole cost of the expedition less than
40001..

18
Niebuhr is assisted, in preparing his works

for the press, by the Danish govern-
ment

19
His

description of Arabia, published in

1772.
Ile marries in 1773

21
The first volume of his travels published
in 1774

ib.
The second volume published in 1778 ib.
He obtains a post in the civil service of
Holstein

22
Account of the employment and inconve-
niences of his latter years

22-28
He was always warmly attached to the

Arabs, and hated the Turks as their

tyrants and oppressors
His correspondence with literary men 25, 26
He becomes blind about 7 years before
his death

29
Death of his wife in 1807

ib,
His own death in 1815, at the age of
82

31
General sketch of his character

31, 32

24

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LIFE OF WREN,

3, 4

13, 14

Comparison of the Egyptian, Greek, In-

dian, Chinese, and Turkish architecture 1
Resemblance of the pyramids of Mexico
to those of Egypt

2
of the palaces of Montezuma to
those of the emperor of China ib.
The temples of Hindostan similar to the
ruins of Dendyra in Egypt

ib.
Difference between the fine arts and the

sciences, as respects their advantage to

mankind
Grecian architecture contrasted with that

of the Egyptians
Of the orders of Greek architecture, their

proportions, and what constitutes their
beauty

4-6
Concerning the picturesque in architecture 6
Of Gothic architecture-the title a misno-

mer, the Goths having had no share in
its invention

ib.
Of Roman architecture

7
Epochs of the several styles of architecture ib.
Introduction of the Italian style into Eng
Birth and parentage of Wren (1632) 8
Wren invented an astronomical instrument
at thirteen years of age .

9
educated at Oxford, where his
nius was particularly remarked by Ough-
tred and Bishop Wilkins

ib.
was one of the earliest investiga.
tors of the properties of the cycloid 10

- employed at the age of fifteen as

assistant demonstrator of anatomy ai
Oxford

11
Wren first proposed the injection of va-

rious liquids into the veins of living ani-
mals

ib.
elected professor of astronomy, at
Gresham College, London, in 1657 . 11

chosen Savilian professor at Oxford
after the Restoration

12
Origin of the Royal Society

12, 13
Wren discovers a method of calculating
solar eclipses

13
His various communications to the Royal

Society
He was a poet as well as an astronomer 14
Published his Prælectiones Astronomice'

at the Oxford press, in 1662
Visit to Paris in pursuit of his favourite

study of architecture in 1665
Wren's proposed plan for the improve-

ment of the city, after the fire of Lon-
don

15, 16
General form of the early churches 17, 18
Wren's first design for St. Paul's Church
objected to

19
St. Paul's Church' finished in 35 years,

while St. Peter's at Rome took 145 years
in building

ib.
Outline engravings, representing the com-

ib.

ib.

land

7,8

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parative heights and sizes of some of the

largest buildings in the world
Comparison of the different species of
stone, with respect to durability

22, 23

20, 21

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