The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of George Third, 1760-1860, Volum 2

Forside
W.J. Widdleton, 1866

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold


Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 77 - They parted - ne'er to meet again! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs, which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between; But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Side 206 - If all mankind, minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
Side 488 - Great Britain, give and grant to your Majesty — what? Our own property? No! We give and grant to your Majesty the property of your Majesty's Commons of America. It is an absurdity in terms.
Side 519 - But how much nobler will be the Sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say, that he found law dear, and left it cheap; found it a sealed hook — left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich — left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression — left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Side 408 - See shall think fit otherwise to provide, we govern and shall continue to govern, the counties of Middlesex, Hertford and Essex, as Ordinary thereof, and those of Surrey, Sussex, Kent, Berkshire, and Hampshire, with the islands annexed, as Administrator with Ordinary jurisdiction.
Side 303 - There is nothing, certainly, more unreasonable, more inconsistent with the rights of human nature, more contrary to the spirit and precepts of the Christian religion, more iniquitous and unjust, more impolitic, than persecution. It is against natural religion, revealed religion, and sound policy.
Side 162 - ... in direct opposition to the declared sense of a great majority of the nation, and they should be put in force with all their rigorous provisions, if his opinion were asked by the people as to their obedience, he should tell them, that it was no longer a question of moral obligation and duty, but of prudence.
Side 524 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants : it is always unknown ; it is different in different men ; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst it is every vice, folly, and passion, to which human nature is liable.'*- — Lord Camden.
Side 173 - Give me but the liberty of the Press, and I will give to the minister a venal House of Peers — I will give him a corrupt and servile House of Commons — I will give him the full...
Side 467 - Commons, by moving for leave to bring in a bill " for the more equal representation of the people in parliament.

Bibliografisk informasjon