The complete works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volum 4

Forside
Houghton, Mifflin, 1903
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 88 - The loyalty, well held to fools, does make Our faith mere folly: — Yet he that can endure To follow with allegiance a fallen lord, Does conquer him that did his master conquer, And earns a place i
Side 305 - O friend, my bosom said, Through thee alone the sky is arched, Through thee the rose is red, All things through thee take nobler form And look beyond the earth, The mill-round of our fate appears A sun-path in thy worth. Me too thy nobleness has taught To master my despair ; The fountains of my hidden life Are through thy friendship fair.
Side 320 - ... souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves.
Side 349 - These temples grew as grows the grass; Art might obey, but not surpass. The passive Master lent his hand To the vast soul that o'er him planned; And the same power that reared the shrine Bestrode the tribes that knelt within.
Side 341 - I will write it, — that there is one topic peremptorily forbidden to all well-bred, to all rational mortals, namely, their distempers. If you have not slept, or if you have slept, or if you have headache, or sciatica, or leprosy, or thunderstroke, I beseech you by all angels to hold your peace, and not pollute the morning, to which all the housemates bring serene and pleasant thoughts, by corruption and groans.
Side 14 - He was of an industry and vigilance not to be tired out, or wearied by the most laborious; and of parts not to be imposed upon by the most subtle or sharp; and of a personal courage equal to his best parts...
Side 339 - Whereas my birth and spirit rather took The way that takes the town; Thou didst betray me to a ling'ring book, And wrap me in a gown. I was entangled in the world of strife, Before I had the power to change my life.
Side 316 - The gods talk in the breath of the woods, They talk in the shaken pine, And fill the long reach of the old seashore With dialogue divine; And the poet who overhears Some random word they say Is the fated man of men Whom the ages must obey...
Side 39 - Out of Plato come all things that are still written and debated among men of thought.
Side 6 - He is great who is what he is from nature, and who never reminds us of others.

Bibliografisk informasjon