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them to diligence and faithfulness, in the discharge of their duties. To report correctly, they must be acquainted with the qualifications of the teachers, with the state of the schools, with the improvement made, and with existing ernbarrassments, deficiencies and evils. But this knowledge can be acquired only by frequently visiting the schools, and by careful observation and inquiry, while there.

Again, such a report, carefully prepared and spread out before the town, is suited to awaken a deeper interest in the cause of education, to excite a proper emulation between the different school districts in a town, and to lead parents to see the importance of having their children improve the privileges afforded them, to the best advantage.

Property left to children may be soon squandered away. But a well cultivated and well furnished mind cannot be alienated, whatever outward changes befall the individual, and however society may suffer from rapine and revolution. Give a child a good education, and let him be fortified by moral principle, and be under the influence of the fear of God, and he will have the power of acquiring a comfortable livelihood, wherever he is; he will secure the esteem of those among whom he lives, and when he dies, the world will be the better for his having lived in it.

Knowledge is power, all the world over. But it is eminently so in this country, where every employment, profession, art, and office, are open to the attainment of every free born child. On this account, it is hardly possible for too much importance to be attached to the elevation and improvement of the great means of education aniony us, the Common Schools.

It is a matter of surprise, that in the construction of schoolhouses, in former times, so little regard should have been had to the health, the comfort, the ease and improvement, of those who were to be assembled there for study, from week to week, and year to year. But that schoolhouses, confessedly ill constructed and unfit for the purpose, should be suffered to remain, and to remain unaltered, and unimproved, is perhaps still more strange, especially when it is known and conceded, that money expended upon scholars, under such circumstances, is expended under great disadvantages, and often to very little purpose.

Your committee would here express it as their opinion, that all the old schoolhouses in town ought to be fitted up anew, or what would be better still, that new ones ought to take their places. And they believe, that so far froin its being any pecuniary disadvantage to the several districts to do so, it would be for their temporal interest, and add much to the beauty and respectability of the town.

lu conclusion, your committee would recommend to the citizens of this town, to cherish the institution of Common Schools, and the interests of good learning among us, as of prime importance. They would recommend, that teachers be selected with care,—that the schoolhouses be made as comfortable and convenient as possible,—that parents uphold teachers in the maintenance of good government, without which, schools can profit little,—and finally, that they manifest their deep interest in this cause, by sending their children regularly and constantly to school, and encourage them in their studies while there, by frequently calling in, and especially, by being present at the examinations.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-Francis Norwood, Levi Gould, Walter BLANCHARD.

WOBURN,

{(1) Population, 2,643. Valuation, $455,030 00. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Suminer, 521—In Winter, 586. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 307–In Winter, 372. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 745.- No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, -No.over 16 years of age who attend School, 50. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 83 mths.-In Suinmer, 51–In Winter, 29. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F.9.-.No. of Teachers in Winter-M.I-F. .

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(7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $32 00—To Females, $15 94. (8) Average value of board per month-or Males, $10 22-Or Females, $6 44. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board—of Males, $21 78—0f Females, $9 00. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including ouly the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $2,000 00. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ (12) No. of incorporated Academies, 1.-Aggregate of months kept, 10.-Average number of

Scholars, 44.-Aggregate paid for tuition, $600. (13) No. of unincorporaled Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 3.-Aggregate of months kept, 9.-Average No. of Scholars, 30.-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $600. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

.-Income from same, $ BOOKS USED.-Spelling-Cummings', Eincrson's National. Reading-Porter's Rhetorical Reader, American First Class Book, English Reader, Young do. Grummar-Smith's. Geography-Olney's, Worcester's, Malle-Brun's, Peter Parley's. Arithmetic-Smith's, Emer. sou's, Adains', Colburn's. All others-Easy Lessons, Walls on the Miud, Goodrich's' History of the U.S., Walker's Dictionary. SELECTIONS FROM REPORT.

All the district schools have been visited monthly, by some one or more of the committee.

Agreeably to an act of the Legislature, passed April 13th, 1838, requiring " registers to be faithfully kept," in all the town and district schools in the Coinmonwealth, your committee, having received a sufficient number of registers from the Secretary of the State, have taken particular pains in causing them to be correctly kept by the teachers of our schools. From statistical facts contained in the registers, and from personal visitalions of each member of the committee, we can speak of the actual condition of our district schools with entire confidence, and, on the whole, with great sntisfaction. In each of our monthly visits, we have inquired into the state of the school ; exainined the progress of the scholars and the discipline of the instructers; enjoined upon the former, industry, obedience, and attention to their mora's and manners ; and upon the latter, punctuality, fidelity and firmness.

On the whole, therefore, we are decidedly of the opinion, that our district schools are taking a position very considerably in advance of what they have held in former years. SCIIOOL COMMITTEE.-Jos. Bennett, Noah HOOPER, J. C. WALDO.

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ASHBURNHAM, .

S (1) Population, 1,758. Valuation, $253,215 00.

Number of Public Schools, 10. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 426–In Winter, 531. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 306—In Wirter, 409. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 417.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 55.–No. over 16 years of age who allend School, 25. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 45 mihs. 7 days.-In Summer, 25—In Winter, 20 7. (6). No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F.11.–No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 9–F. 3. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, 823 65_To Females, $ 12 06. (8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $6 95—Of Females, $5 73. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $1700_Of Females, $6 33. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $900. (H) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate months kept, . -Average number of

Scholars, :-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Sehools, -Aggregate of months kept, 7.--Average No. of Scholars, 160.-Aggre.

gate paid for tuition, $105. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ -Income from same, $

BOOKS USED.- -Spelling-Lee's and Marshall's. Reading–Testament, Intelligent and Rhetorical Readers, Popular Lessons, American Class Book. Grammar-Pond's Murray's and Smith's. Geography-Olney's, Smitli's, Malle-Brun's. Arithnietic-Colburu's First Lessons, Adams' and Sinith's. All others History, Astronomy, Philosophy, Chemistry.

REMARKS.-" The aggregate number of scholars is probably too large, from being counted in different schools.”

Private Schools in “ several districts ;"-number not given in the return.
SELECTIONS FROM REPORT.

Experience and observation induce the committee to believe, that females may be employed to a greater extent than has yet been done. If districts will adopt this course, schools may be lengthened one quarter or a third; but districts must do this by mutual, and nearly unanimous consent. The reasons that have formally been urged against employing females to teach our winter schools, bave of late been tested in several of our schools, and the result has been to show, that the reasons urged against the practice were not well grounded. *

Your committee would close by earnestly recommending to the several districts, the necessity of purchasing a small apparatus, by which we mean, a globe, maps and charts, mathematical blocks, &c. The cost is but trifling, compared with the benefit derived from the use of them. It has been pur. chased, the past year, in district No. 10, and used with decidedly beneficial re. sults.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-John C. GLAZIER, JEROME W. FOSTER, EBENEZER Frost.

{(1) Population

, 1,003. Valuation, $270,368 00.

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ATHOL,

Public . (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Suinmer, 361-In Winter, 532.

years of

(3) Average attendance in the Sehools—In Summer, 268—In Winter, 387. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 445.-No. of persons under 4

age who attend School, 32.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 80. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 66 mths. 14 days.-In Summer, 30 21-In Winter, 35 21. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 10.— No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 7.-F. 7. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $23 65— To Females, $11 34. (8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $6 44—Of Females, $5 33. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $17 21-Of Females, $6 02. (10) Amount of money raised by laxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,200. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $23 18. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, .-Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 1.-Aggregate of months kept, 3.-Average No. of Scholars, 40.-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, $120. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

BOOKS USED:- -Spelling North American and Lee's. Reading-Rhetorical, Popular and Improved Readers, Firsi Class Book, Second and General Class Book, Easy Lessons. Grammar-Pond's Murray's and Smith's. Arithmetic-Smith's, Adams', Emerson's, Colburu's. All others-Bailey's Algebra, Goodrich's and Parley's History, Comstock's Philosophy and Chemistry.

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*

*

SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * It is believed that the schools in town, generally, were never in a more prosperous condition, than during the past year. In comparing our schools, at the present time, with what they were many, or even a few years ago, we perceive that the contrast is very great. In mentioning these improvements, we would not be understood as intimating, that the means of instruction are already perfect, so that nothing more is necessary to be done. On the contrary, we believe that very great improvements are still practicable and necessary, in relation to all the particulars which have been referred to and many others; that the system of instruction in our primary schools, generally, is still very defective, and that much needs be done to render them what they may, and ought to be. But, by viewing the improvements which have already been made, we have encouragement to go on in the good work, to exert ourselves to remove existing evils, and to make still greater progress. * If a greater interest were felt generally, many existing evils would be remedied. The improvements wbich are made are usually in proportion to the degree of interest felt in the subject. It depends very much upon the people in a school district, whether their school is a profitable or an unprofitable one.

We have said, that the schools generally in town have been in a prosperous condition, during the past year. But to this there have been a few exceptions ; one in particular, which the committee think necessary to mention.

It is required by law, that, “in every school in this Commonwealth containing fifty scholars as the average number, the school district or town, to which such school belongs, shall be required to employ a female assistant or assistants, unless such school district or town shall, at a meeting regularly called for thc purpose, vote to dispense with the same." This regulation it is particularly desirable should be carried into effect, in the schools in districts No. 1 and No. 7, as they both contain niore than fifty scholars, as the average number ; and if a female assistant be employed, it is absolutely necessary, in order that the school may be profitable, that it be divided; that the sinaller scholars be taken away from the larger ones, and placed in a convenient and comfortable room, by themselves, under the care of the female assistant. Neither of the schoolhouses, at present, contains more than one school-room, and that room is much too small to accommodate, comfortably, all the scholars belonging to the distriet; and even if the school rooms were sufficiently large and well constructed, we deern it indispensable to the well being of both the schools referred to, that they be divided, -that the smaller scholars be separated from the larger ones.

*

Consider, for a moment, the condition of one of these schools, where all the scholars altend school together in the same room. There are from fifty to eighty scholars on an average, and the houses are 100 small, particularly the one in district No. 7, to accommodate them comfortably. Seats that were made for only two scholars, bave frequently to accommodate tree or four; and even if there was no deficiency in the size or construction of the rooms, low is one teucher to do any thing like justice to so many, of such different ages and capacities? There are in each school, probably, froin forty-five to sixty large scholars, considerably advanced in the studies uttended to; and they require, and, in order to make good proficiency, they must have, the teacher's whole attention. But this they cannot have, itilie smaller ones ore at all attended to. There are from twenty to thirty small scholars, most of them. 100 young to study, or to make any proficiency, unassisted by the teacher; and they, of course, in order to make good proficiency, require the whole, or nearly the whole, of the teacher's attention. Now, one or the other of these classes of scholars must be neglected. The larger ones must not be neglected, for the winter school is more especially for their benefit. If any are neglected, it must be ile saller ones, and these are, and must be, very much neglected. It is necessarily so, however well qualified the teacher may be for the business of instruction,—for his attention must chiefly be given to the larger scholars. And what, think you, will those little ones be doing, during the long and tedious hours that they are required to attend school ? It is unnatural to suppose that they will be still, or that they can be kept decently still and orderly, without very great trouble. They are too young to study much,—the teacher cannot atiend to them; of course, they learn but liule. They are placed, usually, on hard, umcomfortable seats,-necessarily so near together ihat it is very convenient for them to wbisper,-frequently before an uncomfortably bot stove,-compelled to breathe an unbealthy atniosphere, and they cannot be still; it would be unrensonable to expect them to be so, uuder such circumistances. They make a great deal of noise and disturbance in school, which they derive very little benesit to theniselves frorn attending ;-when, could they be placed in a colivenient room by themselves, under the care of a suitabile female teacher, who would give her whole attention to them and engage their attention, it would be pleasant to them, as well as profitable, to attend school.

We ought to have said before, that the school, in district No. 1, has been divided, and that a female assistant has been employed, during the winter, for several years past; and that this arrangement has given general, we believe universal, satisfaction, and has been productive of greater advantages even than was anticipated.

Another improvement in the means of instruction, which the committee would suggest, for the consideration of each of the several school districts in town, is the procuring of some cheap school apparatus. SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-STEPHEN A. BARNARD, J. W. HUMPHRIES.

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AUBURN,

(1) Population, 1,183. Valuation, $162,512 00. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools In Summer, 195—In Winter, 188. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 114-In Winter, 133. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 181.- No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 24.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 16. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 31 mths. 21 days.-In Summer, 20 14.-In Winter, 11 7. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F.6.-No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 1-F. 3. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board_To Males, $24 00—To Females, $11 83. (8) Average value of board per mogıhof Males, $700—0f reinales, $3 33. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $1704—Or Females, $6 50. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $400. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $30.

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