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scholars should be well supplied with the prescribed books, at the very outset of each school, and their attendance should be punctual and constant.

A considerable defect or deficiency in any of these things is deurimental, in a high degree, to the whole school. This, we regret to say, we have had occasion not unfrequently to notice and lament; and we feel it our duty to state explicitly, that these deficiencies do actually exist, to no inconsiderable extent. We would, therefore, respectfully urge upon your attention, the importance and necessity, to well-regulated schools, of remedying, as far as possible, every known defect, and supplying every want. For the more perfect our schools are in these respects, and the deeper the interest taken in their improvement, the more and more valuable and beneficial will they become to the whole community, and especially to those who have no other means of educating their children.

As a general thing, we find the character of a school principally depends upon the competency and skill of its teacher. Consequently, we often see it alternately rising and falling, according to the ability and faithfulness with which it is taught. But this is not always the case. For other causes are sometimes at work, to produce a somewhat different result,—10 defeat the object of the most skilful, and disappoint the most sanguine expectations. Instances of this sort are, therefore, exceptions to a general rule, and seldom occur.

In visiting and examining the schools, the past summer and winter, we are gratified in being able to state, that we noticed a general improvement in the different departnients of study. In several of the schools, we found much to commend. They were as perfect, under all circumstances, as we could expect. The greatest deficiency in any, was a want of proper discipline and order; and, consequently, of that attention, application and diligence, which are absolutely necessary to much proficiency in knowledge. We noticed, also, soine defect in the seasonable supply of books; and heard frequent complaiuts on account of tardiness and inconstancy of attendance. These we consider serious evils, which we hope will hereafter be corrected, and whatever is fuulty, be improved. * *

The school committee of the west parish iq Brookfield have the pleasure of reporting, that, in their opinion, the general interests of education among us are evidently progressive. Though manifest deficiencies are yet visible in our schools, there are tokens of improvement gradually extending. * use of black-boards, and eligible text books, for the last few years, as also the increased competency of teachers, have given to this department, peculiar prominence. Whether other needful branches of instruction have, meanwhile, secured a proportionate measure of regard, is seriously questionable. That elementary exercises, however, should be more highly appreciated, we have not a doubt. Reading, spelling, pronouncing and defining, and, withal, the management of the voice, should each be deemed of essential service. What avails it, for example, that a teacher has the reputation of being able to instruct, even in algebra, it, at the same time, he is ignorant of the orthography or pronunciation of the simple word, arithmetic ? Attention, surely, to little things, must, in the nature of the case, constitute no ininor share of the business of primary education. Excellence, without this, is unattainable. There is no neglecting these fundamental points, without essential and enduring injury. Correctness of instruction, in matters pertaining to the very elenients, is therefore, in our view, essentially important.

As respects the government of schools, it is the opinion of the committee, that parents can do much to prevent the necessity of any considerable trouble. Let teachers have that countenance, which they deserve; yea, that coöperation from this source, which is manisestly reasonable ; and, if they are competent to the office, their just authority will be maintained with little inconvenience to theinselves or their pupils. *

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-Seth Alden, Francis Horton, Edwin B. TaiNTER, JAIRUS WALKER.

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CHARLTON,

(1) Population, 2,469. Valuation, $569,837 00.

Number of Public Schools, 13. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 406– In Wiuter, 528. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 290—In Winter, 392. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 5 10 — No. of persons under 4

ycars of age who altend School, 42.—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 40. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 76 inths.-In Summer, 35 14-In Winter, 40 14. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-)1.-F. 13.-No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 11-F. 2. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $23 71–10 Feinales, $10 66. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $700_Of Females, $3 30. (9) Average wages per inonth, exclusive of board of Males, 8 16 71–Of Females, $5 36. (10) Amount of noney raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and suel, $1,200. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $111 23. (12) No. of incorporated Academics, -Aggregate of months kept, .-Average number of

Scholars, -Aggregale paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .-Aggregate of months kept, -Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

.-Income from same, $ Books ust.D.-Spelling Lee's and Cummings'. Reading-Young Lady's Class Bonk, Worcester's 2n, 3d and 4th Books, Scoli's Lessons. Grummur Smith's and Murray's. Ge. ography-Oley's, Smith's, Parley's. Arithmetic-Adams’, Smith's and Colburu's. All others Goodrich’s llisiory, Blake's Philosophy, Day's Algebra, Colburu's Algebra. SELECTION FROM REPORT.

The thanks of the school committee are respectfully tendered to parents and others, who have added to the interests of the schools, in the several districts, by their timely visits. Much may be done in this way, to increase the usefulness of each school in town. Each district committee should require of the person engaged, a certificate of qualification from the school committee of the town, before his services com

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-AURIN BUGBEE, Wm. P. MARBLE.

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DANA,

(1) Population, 060. Valuation, $110,957 25.

Number of Public Schools, 5. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 92—In Winter, 160. (3) Average a tendance in the Schools-In Summer, 81-In Winter, 133. (4) No. of persons helween 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 163.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who allend School, -No, over 16 years of age who attend School, (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 13 mihs.-In Sumner, 8 14-In Winter, 9 14. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 4.-No. of Teachers in Winter-1.5—F. (7) Average wages paid per month including board—To Males, $ 18 90To Fema.es, $7 66. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $6 40_Of Females, $3 83. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $1250_Of Females, 83 83. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including oniy the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $210. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $105 03. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .-Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of Scholars, :-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, 8 (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ .-Income from same, $

looks USED.-Spelling-Perry's and Webster's. Reading-First and Second Class Books

Testament. Grammar-Murray's and Smith's. Geography—Olney's. ArithmeticAdams'. All others—Franklin Primer, Blake's Philosophy, Perry's, Johnson's and Walker's Dictionaries.

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SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * In No. 1, the teacher was not examined. On the whole, we are of opinion, that the schools were taught by persons who were well qualified for the business, and that the schools made considerable proficiency in the several branches of arithmetic, geography, English grammar, writing, reading and spelling, excepting one.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-Joshua Flagg, Enoch BARROWS, Justus Woods.

DOUGLAS,

(1) Population, 1,713. Valuation, $316,448 00.

Number of Public Schools, 8. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 33411 Winter, 439. (3) age altendance in the Schools-In ner, 246—1 Winter, 319. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 483.—No. of persons under 4 years

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age who attend School, 60.—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 72. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 45 mihs. 7 days.-u Summer, 22-1. Winter, 22 7. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M.-F. 8.-No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 7-F. 2 (7) Average wages paid per inonth, including board—To Males, $23 37—To Females, $12 50. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $6 87–Of Females, $5 50. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $15 50--Or Females, $700. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including ouly the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $640. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $19. (12) No. of incorporated Acadenies, .-Aggregate of months kepi, :-Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregale paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorpozaled Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept io prolong Common

Schools, 3.-Aggregate of months kept, 7.--Average No. of Schulars, 100.-Aggre

gale paid for luition, $160. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $3,300 00 -Income from same, $198 00.

BOOKS USED.- -Spelling National. Reading-Anerican First Class Book, Introduction to the National Reader. Grummur-Smith's. Geogruphy-Oluey's. Aritlímetic-Smith's and Daboil's.

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ment.

SELECTIONS FROM REPOR'T. Your committee are happy in being able to state, that, in general, the condition of the schools, the past year, as compared with former years, has been such as to warrant them in the expression of the opinion, that there is in them, a manifest and decided inprove

* Your comınittee lave endeavored to discharge their duty with all fidelity in the examination of teachers ;-they have done what they could to protect the town from teachers of a manifest incompetency, and the districts, from the worse than useless burden of unlearned and un-kiliul instructers. *

They have visited each school at the opening and closing thereof, as the law requires, and can with truth say, that, with oue exception, the schools, both summer and winter, have made as much progress, and, in their final examination at the close, appeared as satisfactory, as your committee had reason to expect.

Laxity of discipline and defect in the government of the school are defects which a school coinmittee are scarcely ever able to detect in a teacher, until the school bas commenced and the opening examination discloses it. Your committee need scarcely say, that, in all cases, school committees should limit their certificate of approbation to the literary qualifications of the candidate, and he should always be informed, that, unless his government be good, his certificate of literary qualifications will ņot avail him, or entitle him to compen

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sation. And your committee would here remark, that one of the greatest defects, in the practical administration of our Common School system, is the lack of government.

Your committee would close their report, by adverting to the heedlessness and inattention of parents to the welfare of the schools, as one of the greatest obstacles to the successful working of the system. Our schools are dead, because we, the parents, are so. If we would infuse life into our schools, we must first infuse it into ourselves; we must awake to the importance of education and of schools, if we would have our children awake and alive to it. Parents must visit our schools; must see for themselves; take an interest in the expenditures of their school funds; and, must, by their presence at the examinations of the schools, and at other times, show their children that they take a deep interest in their education, and are alive to the importance of good schools, good teachers and good scholars. Let us be interested ourselves in this matter, and our children's interest will be increased in it. Our schoolhouses, instead of being, to our children, places of gloom, of darkness and dread, will become the abodes of cheerfulness, sought after and courted by children, as much as they are now avoided and shunned.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-AARON A. Wallis, TURNER THAYER.

DUDLEY,

(1) Population, 1,415. Valuation, $431,779 50.

Number of Public Schools, 8. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools-In Summer, 333-In Winter, 413. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 236—In Winter, 315. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 399.-No. of persons under 4 years

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'age who attend School, 37.—No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 32. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 54 mths. 14 days.-In Summer, 29—In Winter, 25 14. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 9.-No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 7-F. 2. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board_To Males, $2371—To Females, $11 27. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $5 43—Of Females, $5 41. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board_Of Males, $18 28–Of Females, $5 86. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,000. (11) Amount of board and suel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $ 120. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, 1.-Aggregate of months kept, 44.-Average number of

Scholars, 42.-Aggregate paid for tuition, $500. (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept 10 prolong Common

Schools, 3.-Aggregate of months kept, 4.-Average No. of Scholars, 47.- Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $96. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ -Income from same, $

BOOKS USED. - Spelling-Webster's. Reading—Worcester's Primer, Young Reader, Worcester's Third Book, Select Reader, New Testament. Grammar-Smith's. Geography-01ney's and Hall's. Arithmetic-Colburn's Mental and Adams'. All others-Olney's Hisiory of the U. S., Watts on the Mind.

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SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * In discharging their duty at this time, the committee respectfully report, that they believe that the money which you so liberally granted the last year, has generally been judiciously and wisely expended.

The committee could say to you, that such and such schools have been of the first class, and that such have been good ones, and that such others have been of an indifferent character, in which but little has been done. And where there has been any thing like a failure, it has been owing to what we sometimes call a want of “tact in school teaching."

One (schoolhouse] has undergone thorough repairs, and is convenient. Another has been removed to a more pleasant and central location ;-and one new house has been built. It is a fine, commodious school-room, and it has been kept in the choicest manner, which speaks well for the teachers and scholars. A new, clean, convenient and pleasant school-room, has charms for scholars, which an old, dirty, unpleasant one never can have.

Your committee have made special effort, to have the same series of books in each school, so that all the scholars may be taught on the same plan. It is earnestly requested, that the districts will aid the committee in their efforts to have a uniform series of books throughout the town. This can be done by purchasing such books, and such only, as the committee recommend.

The committee would recommend, that there be still greater care in the selection of teachers. They should not be employed simply because they wish to teach. There should be inquiry on the part of the prudential committees, respecting their character, habits, and probable influence in the schools. The whole community should take a high stand on the subject of teachers, and then they will have teachers of a high order.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-WALTER FOLLETT, ABIEL HEALY.

FITCHBURG, .

Ş(1) Population, 2,662. Valuation, $406,879 75.

Number of Public Schools, 13. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 510—In Winter, 674. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 414-In Winter, 500. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 706.—No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 58.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 86. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 68 mths. 14 days.-In Summer, 35 7–In Winter, 33 7. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer—M. -F. 15.—No. of Teachers in Winter-M. 9–F. 7. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, 324 38—To Females, $13 98. (8) Average value of board per month—Of Males, $7 05.–Of Females, $5 96. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $17 33—Of Females, 87 02. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,500. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $20. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate of months kept, :-Average No. of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 2.-Aggregate of months kept, 24.-Average No. of Scholars, 58.-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $513. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

.-Income from same, $ Books USED. --Spelling-Emerson's National. Reading-Classical Reader, Second Classical Reader, Juvenile and Popular Lessons, Worcester's Primer. Grummar-Smith’s. Geography-Malte-Brun’s, Smith's, Parley's. Arithmetic-Emerson's, Adams' and Colburu's. SELECTIONS FROM REPORT.

Of the schools collectively we are constrained to say, that they have presented no marked improvement on those of preceding years. A diversity of condition has been apparent. In several districts, we have witnessed, with high satisfaction, awakened interest, and decided progress. In others, insubordination and habits of idleness have prevailed; and, as a necessary result, the efforts of the teacher, however faithful, have been coinparatively fruitless of good. *

More attention than has been common in the selection of teachers must be given, both to their literary attainments, and to their capacity to communicate knowledge, and to govern a school. The idea should never be entertained, that every individual, who can pass a good examination, in the branches of study required by law, is competent to be entrusted with the education of your children. Good teachers love their chosen occupation; are interested in the improvement, intellectual and moral, of the rising generation ; and are severely disappointed, whatever pecuniary compensation they may receive, when the true purpose of their office is not advanciug. Aptness to teach,

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