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(11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $358. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, .-Aggregate of months kept, .-Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated' Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 10.-Aggregate of months kept, 68.--Average No. of Scholars, 336.-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $715. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

.-Income from same, $

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Books USED.-Spelling Webster's, Hazen's Speller and Definer. Reading-National Reader, Intelligent Reader, Child's Guide, Easy Primer. Grammar-Smith's. Geography Smith's, Peter Parley's Small. Arithmetic-Smith's, Colburn's. Other books are used.

SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. In regard to the improvements, we are sorry to say that, during the year, there have been but few, if any, improvements. We know of but a single instance, that is worthy of notice. One school, hitherto very large, bas, during the season, been divided and two teachers employed instead of one ; the larger scholars being placed under the care of a male teacher, and the smaller, of a female. This is an improvement, even though the scholars should not be in school more than three fourths as many months or weeks in the year, as when they were all under the care of one teacher.

In regard to the defects in the methods or means of education, the committee would observe, that, in many of our districts, there is cause to complain of the schoolhouses. In some of them, there is a degree of convenience and neatness in their construction and finish, and something, that is an approximation, at least, to what may be considered comfortable ; but even this cannot be said of more than one half of the schoolhouses in our districts. Some are inconvepient in their construction ; others are poorly finished, so that, in cold weather, inuch of the tinie must be taken up in going to the fire.

Another thing, that operates unfavorably to the success of our schools, is the almost entire neglect, on the part of parents and guardians, to visit them. In some few of the schools, some of the parents have visited, perhaps, once or twice during the year; but of the greater part, it must be said, that they have known nothing of the schools, by actual observation, from the time they first commenced till they closed. An individual is hired to teach our children, a work almost more important than any other,—and yet, he is suffered to go on, week after week, and even month after month, and we never once inquire, whether he is doing them good or not; whether he is idling away his time, and causing our children to form indolent habits; or, whether he is improving them and preparing them for future usefulness.

To one district, these remarks will not apply. In that district, parents have been more ready to do their duty; they have been ready to visit their school, and this they have done systematically. Arrangements have been made, that the school should be visited at least a number of times during the season. This is as it should be. Every school should be visited, once a week, by some one or more of the parents; or, at least, once a fortnight, and once or twice during the season, by all the parents together. *

But another difficulty, in the way to the success of our schools, is a dislike to the law, which requires a committee to be chosen to superintend the schools. Such are the feelings of many towards such a committee, that their whole object seems to be, not to assist, but to oppose them; and not unfrequently, the displeasure that is felt towards the law itself, falls upon the executive of that law, so that it becomes unsafe to one's private interest and happiness, to act in the capacity of a committee. Owing to this feeling among the people, almost the entire good that might be done, by the committee, must be left wholly undone. Some would have the committee do their duty, and are willing to sustain them in doing it, and, if they do not, will be dissatisfied; while others would have them neglect it, and are ready to cry out against them, if they do not. Thus, if they neglect their duty, or perform it, they will be opposed, and thus, too, the cause of education is made to suffer.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-Alonzo SANDERSON, Geo. BOOTH.

MONSON,

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Public Schools, 16 (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools In Summer, 461mln Winter, 644. (3) Average attendance in the Schools In Summer, 353 In Winter, 469. $4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 608.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who atteud School, 50.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 83. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 102 mths. 21 days.-In Summer, 52 7-In Winter, 50 14, (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 15.-No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 13_F. 3. (7) Average wages paid per month including board To Males, $21 58.-To Females, $10 79. (8) Average value of board per month-Of Males, $6 15 Of Females, $6 02. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $15 43—Of Females, $4 77. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,100. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $362. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, 1.--Aggregate of months kept, 10.-Average No. of

Scholars, 63.-Aggregate paid for tuition, $861 75. (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .--Aggregate of months kept, .--Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gale paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $

Income from same, $ BOOKS USED.-Spelling--Easy Primer, Webster's and Town's Spelling Book. Reading Bible, First Class Book, Intelligent Reader, Child's Guide, Sullivan's Political Class Book. Grammar-Pond's Murray's and Smith's. Geography-Olney's and Smith's. Arithmetic Colburn's, Smith's, Adams'. All others—Watis on the Mind, Parley's History of the U.S. and Geography.

REMARKS.-It is believed that the averages of wages and of board are rightly set down in the Abstract. The wages, board, &c. of two female teachers seem to have been carried into the column of males, because they kept winter schools ;-these are omitted in the computation for males.

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SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. We are more and more convinced, that the systematic visiting of the schools, which is required by the law, has a beneficial influence upon them.

The proficiency of scholars in learning, in a Common School, depends more upon the qualifications of the teacher, as it respects his learning, and, especially, his talent for managing and giving instruction, than upon all other things put together. If he be deficient in these respects, our reasonable expectations will le disappointed, although all other circumstances, respecting the house and books and inspection, be altogether such as we desire. We have noticed, that teachers have failed, not so much for want of literary qualifications, as for want of tact in governing, in communicating instruction, in awakening the emulation of their pupils, and in securing their confidence, affection and efforts to improve. We feel it, therefore, to be highly important to obtain good teachers. Such teachers may not be plenty, but we believe if suitable pains be taken, they may be secured. Let the committees of the districts look out for them in season, and not wait till near the time for opening the school. Let them engage none, except those wbo are well recommended, and, if possible, those who have had experience in teaching,—and let them be ready to offer good wages, and we believe they will not fail of obtaining the services of such as will be faithful and successful. If teachers have done well, let them be secured for the next season, even if higher wages be necessary. It is a fact, that in some cases the money has been almost lost, as it respects the improvement of the school, by reason of the incompetency of the teacher, who was employed on a small compensation. We have noticed a wide difference in schools as to improvement, whose advantages, with respect to terms, house and other conveniencies, were equal. This difference was owing entirely to the teachers who had bech employed. We cannot, indeed, tell how a new teacher will succeed until he has tried, but we are persuaded, that sufficient pains have not been taken in making

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the selection. Let a proper compensation be offered, and good teachers may be obtained. It is certain, that a good teacher will lead forward a school further, in two months, than an ordinary one will in three or four.

The defect with regard to instruction in morals and manners, as provided for in the seventh section of the act concerning public instruction, has not, we fear, been remedied. This is an exceedingly important part in the education of our children. It should be insisted on as essential. The welfare of the community and the happiness of individuals, in a social state, depend more upon virtuous principles and good manners than upon any thing else. This branch of training in our schools must not be lost sight of, nor neglected. *

School District Libraries have been recommended by the Board of Education, and some progress made in publishing suitable books. Such libraries, we have no doubt, would be of great importance to the young, if the books were well selected.

The teachers of the schools, during a part of the last winter, held a teachers' meeting, once in two weeks, for mutual improvement in the mode of teaching and manner of managing schools, which was very interesting to them, and, we think, of much benefit to the schools. At this meeting, the committee had opportunity to meet with and advise the teachers. In this way, the teachers may be greatly benefited ; and if teachers would occasionally visit each other's schools, it would tend to awaken emulation, and, of course, to promote their own improvement and that of their pupils.

In conclusion, we say, that the children and youth, connected with our schools, are bright and promising, and appear to be capable of making great acquisitions in knowledge and virtue, under proper training. They will soon be called to contribute their aid to uphold our civil and religious institutions, and their character, for intelligence and good morals, is the only security we have, that these institutions shall remain unimpaired and continue to shed their rich blessings upon the country. Let us not, then, spare any pains nor expense in training their minds and habits, so that they shall become good citizens, and be happy and useful in all their social relations.

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SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-A. ELY, A. W. PORTER, A. Smith, L. F. Newton, F. NEWELL.

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MONTGOMERY,

Number of Public Schools, 5. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 74-In Winter, 92. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 60—In Winter, 69. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 124.–No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 3.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 7. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 31 mths.-In Summer, 16-In Winter, 15. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M. -F. 4.—No. of Teachers in Winter-M.5_F. . (7) Average wages paid per month including board— To Males, $22 70—To Females, $11 50. (8) Average value of board per month of Males, $800—or Females, $6 00. (9) Average wages per month exclusive of board-Of Males, $14 70—of Females, $550. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $300. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $238. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, .-Average No. of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, .-Aggregate of months kept, .-Average No. of Scholars, .-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $ (14) Amount of Local Funds, $ -Income from same,

Books USED.- -Spelling-Webster's Elementary, Reading-Goodrich's History, English Reader, Testament, Easy Lessons, Angell's Series, Child's Guide. Grammar-Smith's and

Hall's. Geography-Oiney's, Smith's, Parley's. Arithmetic—Daboll's, Smith's, Colburn's. All others-Blake's Philosophy, Comstock’s Chemistry, Day's Algebra.

SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * The condition of the schools this year, is not materially different from what it was last. There have been no improvements of importance, in the means or methods of education, and most of the defects existing last year, exist now.

The progress of the schools has been considerably hindered, in consequence of a deficiency, and a want of conformity, in books.

Each district has as much of the money, raised in the town by taxes, for the support of schools, as it pays. This amounts, generally, to only about thirty five or thirty six dollars a year, in the fourth and fifth districts each, a sum quite too'small to make the schools what they should be.

The money received from the school fund, has hitherto been divided, and given to the districts in proportion to the number of scholars.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-Ransom CLARK, HORACE BARTHOLEMY.

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{( Pombation Public Scaloasi on, 8256,428 06.

PALMER,

Number of Schools, . (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 396-In Winter, 457. (3) Average attendance in the Schools-In Summer, 297-In Winter, 346. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 594.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, 36.-No. over 16 years of age who attend School, 30. (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 80 mths. 21 days—In Summer, 42 21—In Winter, 38. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M.-F. 12.—No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 8-F.5. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board—To Males, $25 00-To Females, $13 00. (8) Average value of board per month Of Males, $7 00—Of Females, $600. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $18 00–Of Females, $700. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $1,200. (11) Amount of board and fuel, if any, contributed for Public Schools, $141. (12) No. of incorporated Academies, -Aggregate of months kept, -Average number of

Scholars, .-Aggregate paid for tuition, $ (13) No. of unincorporated Academies, Private Schools, and Schools kept to prolong Common

Schools, 1.-Aggregate of months kept, 3.-Average No. of Scholars, 25.-Aggre

gate paid for tuition, $100. (14) Amount of Local Funds, $3,779 00.--Income from same, $226 78.

BOOKS USED. -Spelling-National, Franklin Primer. Reading-National Preceptor, Intelligent Reader, Childis Guide, First Class Book. Grammar-Smith's. Geography--Olney's. Arithmetic-Smith's. All others--Walls on the Mind, Astronomy.

SELECTIONS FROM REPORT. * We have endeavored to be faithful and punctual, and are gratified in being able to say, that we have received the cooperation of parents and prudential committees generally; and, judging from the appearance of the schools, and, in some instances, the readiness of parents to lend their aid, we believe, that the subject of Common School education is gaining favor in the community; and, when it is understood in all its bearings fully, not only a part of those concerned will aid in this noble work of schooling the young, but all will feel interested to have the rising generation so thoroughly educated, that, when they come upon the stage of action, they can be safely trusted with our interests, and that we can repose a confidence in them, which kings and emperors can never boast, and which is the greatest safety of a republican government.

Although the law expressly says, that teachers shall not commence school, until they have first been examined by the committee, and received a certificate from them, that they are, in all respects, qualified according to law, yet so

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little is this law respected or understood, that not one third of the teachers were present, at the time appointed by your committee for the examination of teachers for the winter schools. As this law is so explicit on the subject, it seems very mysterious to us, that it is so little regarded, when the welfare of the schools seems so much to depend upon the result; and we regret to say, that one school was kept in town, without the committee's having any knowledge of its being kept at all until after it was finished.

We are sorry to be obliged to say, that the prudential committee told us, when we censured him for not informing us of the school, and not complying with the provisions of the law, in regard to the examination of the teacher, &c., that he was not aware of there being any law on the subject. Although this law has been in existence more than ten years, and acted upon by a committee chosen for that purpose by the town, yet a gentleman is found, who is considered by the district where he resides, as qualified to discharge the duties of a prudential committee, who never knew that there was any law on the subject. How this can be, the committee cannot well conceive, and will submit this part of the report, without further comment.

In our different visitations, we were glad to find the schools, generally, well supplied with the requisite books; and, in no instance were the committee under the painful necessity of taking the course, which the law points out in case of delinquency on the part of parents, masters or guardians, to furnish the books required; and we believe the time has gone by, when some parents have felt, that, to buy a new book for their child, was equivalent to throwing away money, when, in fact, the very opposite is the case, and in no way can money be expended to better advantage for children. Your committee, in visiting the several districts, found considerable difference in their forwardness in the different branches of study, and this seemed not to arise from the advantages of those districts; for, in some of them, where they enjoyed the greatest length of school, and teachers apparently equal, if not superior to others, they were more backward. From examination, we found, in those districts, a greater variety of books of different kinds, used in the schools; particularly in Three Rivers District, where there were no less than seven or eight different classes in geography and arithmetic, and, in some instances, not more than one or two in a class, all on account of the scholars having different books, thus occupying a large portion of the time of the teacher, which ought to have been employed in the other branches. But the committee cannot see, how it can well be avoided, for those districts consist mostly of a floating population; and it would seem too severe to require the inhabitants to buy new books for their children as often as they remove from one town to another, and it would be a tax upon them, which some, at least, are not able to bear; but it serves to show to the town, that a uniformity of books is greatly to be desired, and ought to be urged, when there are no great obstacles to prevent it.

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.-A. V. BLANCHARD, JAMES GAMWELL.

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RUSSELL,

(1) Population, 457. Valuation, $74,005 67.

Number of Public Schools, 4. (2) No. of Scholars of all ages in all the Schools—In Summer, 82—In Winter, 102. (3) Average attendance in the Schools—In Summer, 60—In Winter, 64. (4) No. of persons between 4 and 16 years of age in the town, 99.-No. of persons under 4

years of age who attend School, :-No, over 16 years of age who attend School, (5) Aggregate length of the Schools, 23 mths. 14 days.-In Summer, 13 14—In Winter, 10. (6) No. of Teachers in Summer-M.-F.4.-No. of Teachers in Winter—M. 2-F.2. (7) Average wages paid per month, including board- To Males, $23 50—To Females, $ 12 33. (8) Average value of board per month-of Males, $8 00—Of Females, $6 00. (9) Average wages per month, exclusive of board-Of Males, $15 50-Of Females, $6 33. (10) Amount of money raised by taxes for the support of Schools, including only the wages of

Teachers, board and fuel, $150.

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