The Life and Writings of Sir Joshua Reynolds: First President of the Royal Academy

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A.S. Barnes & Burr, 1860 - 369 sider

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Side 42 - The only dedication I ever made was to my brother, because I loved him better than most other men. He is since dead. Permit me to inscribe this Poem to you.
Side 39 - There is no excellent Beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. A man cannot tell, whether Apelles or Albert Durer were the more trifler; whereof the one would make a personage by geometrical proportions, the other by taking the best parts out of divers faces to make one Excellent.
Side 82 - His talents of every kind, powerful from nature, and not meanly cultivated by letters, his social virtues in all the relations, and all the habitudes of life, rendered him the centre of a very great and unparelleled variety of agreeable societies, which will be dissipated by his death. He had too much merit not to excite some jealousy, too much innocence to provoke any enmity. The loss of no man of his time can be felt with more sincere, general, and unmixed sorrow.
Side 77 - Michael Angelo's works have a strong, peculiar, and marked character : they seem to proceed from his own mind entirely, and that mind so rich and abundant, that he never needed, or seemed to disdain, to look abroad for foreign help. Raffaelle's materials are generally borrowed, though the noble structure is his own.
Side 93 - The mind is but a barren soil ; a soil which is soon exhausted, and will produce no crop, or only one, unless it be continually fertilized and enriched with foreign matter.
Side 33 - I will now add, that Nature herself is not to be too closely copied. There are excellencies in the art of painting beyond what is commonly called the imitation of Nature ; and these excellencies I wish to point out.
Side 34 - ... of antiquity, are continually enforcing this position, that all the arts receive their perfection from an ideal beauty, superior to what is to be found in individual nature. They are ever referring to the practice of the painters and sculptors of their times, particularly Phidias (the favourite artist of antiquity), to illustrate their assertions. As if they could not sufficiently express their admiration of his genius by what they knew, they have recourse to poetical enthusiasm. They call it...
Side 114 - ... entertain such sentiments as these, we generally rest contented with mere words, or at best entertain notions not only groundless but pernicious.
Side 12 - I would chiefly recommend that an implicit obedience to the Rules of Art, as established by the practice of the great Masters, should be exacted from the young Students. That those models which have passed through the approbation of ages should be considered by them as perfect and infallible guides, as subjects for their imitation not their criticism.
Side 229 - ... it ; and does not wait for the slow progress of deduction, but goes at once, by what appears a kind of intuition, to the conclusion. A man endowed with this faculty feels and acknowledges the truth, though it is not always in his power, perhaps, to give a reason for it ; because he cannot recollect and bring before him all the materials that gave birth to his opinion ; for very many and very intricate considerations may unite to form the principle, even of small and minute parts, involved in,...

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