Memoirs of the life of ... John Mytton, by Nimrod

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Side 197 - Who would be doom'd to gaze upon A sky without a cloud or sun ? Less hideous far the tempest's roar Than ne'er to brave the billows more — Thrown, when the war of winds is o'er, A lonely wreck on fortune's shore, 'Mid sullen calm, and silent bay, Unseen to drop by dull decay ; — Better to sink beneath the shock Than moulder piecemeal on the rock...
Side 112 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
Side 164 - ... of wealth and distinction. She was led into society, and they tried by all kinds of occupation and amusement to dissipate her grief, and wean her from the tragical story of her loves.
Side 210 - There is a lust in man no charm can tame, Of loudly publishing his neighbour's shame." Hence ; " On eagle's wings immortal scandals fly, While virtuous actions are but born and die.
Side 163 - cui sic extorta voluptas et demptus per vim mentis gratissimus error».
Side 127 - Even its praises must offend thee, Founded on another's woe: Though my many faults defaced me, Could no other arm be found, Than the one which once embraced me, To inflict a cureless wound?
Side 83 - Without a genius learning soars in vain ; And without learning genius sinks again ; Their force united crowns the sprightly reign.
Side 70 - There were two principles in his natural temper, that being heightened by that heat, carried him to great excesses : a violent love of pleasure, and a disposition to extravagant mirth. The one involved him in great sensuality ; the other led him to many odd adventures and frolics, in which he was oft in hazard of his life...
Side 128 - tis done — all words are idle — Words from me are vainer still ; But the thoughts we cannot bridle Force their way without the...
Side 162 - But there was a worse sight than this : there was a mind, as well as a body, in ruins ; the one had partaken of the injury done to the other, and it was at once apparent that all was a wreck. In fact, he was a melancholy spectacle of a fallen man — of one over whom all the storms of life seemed to be engendered in one dark cloud.

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