Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

CHAPTER IV.

FINANCE.-- The Chancellor of the Exchequer makes his second Financial

Statement for the Year, on the 5th of April— He explains at length the motives which had influenced him in making his Propositions to the House, and the subsequent modifications in his Plans-He proposes a total Repeal of the Window Tax in lieu of the Alteration before propounded, and retracts some of the boons to the Agricultural Interest which had been ungraciously received— The Budget meets with a more favourable reception than the former one.

THE INCOME TAX.--Mr. Herries moves a Resolution directed to an alleviation of that ImpostHe is answered by the Chancellor of the Ecchequer-Speeches of Mr. Prinsep, Mr. F. Peel, Mr. T. Baring, Mr. J. Wilson, Sir R. Inglis, and other MembersMr. Herries's Resolution is rejected on a division by 278 against 230The Second Reading of the Income Tax Bill is opposed by Mr. Spooner and Mr. Muntz, but without effectOn the Bill going into Committee, Mr. Hume moves that the Grant le limited to one year, with the object of having the whole subject considered in a Select Committee - The Amendment is opposed by the Government, also by Mr. Cobden and Mr. Sidney Herbert-It is supported by Alderman Thompson, Mr. Miles, and Mr. Disraeli, and is carried by 244 to 230, amidst great cheering from the OppositionA few days afterwards, Lord John Russell declares the intention of the Government to acquiesce in the Amendment-Remarks of Mr. Disraeli -- Mr. Hume experiences much difficulty in nominating a Select Committee on the Income Tax-Discussion as to the object of the Amendment, and the motires of those who had supported it-Remarks of Lord John Russell and Sir C. Wood— A Committee is at length nominated. PROTECTIONIST FINANCE.—On the 30th of June Mr. Disraeli moves certain Resolutions respecting the Financial Position and Prospects of the Country, and the Policy of the GovernmentHis Speech-He is answered by the Chancellor of the ExchequerSpeeches of Mr. Nevedegate, Mr. Labouchere, Mr. Hume, and other MembersThe Resolutions are negatired by a majority of 113. ALTERATION OF DUTIES ON COFFEE AND TIMBER.— The former opposed by Mr. E. H. Stanley, but agreed to by the House-Mr. T. Baring moves a Resolution condemnalory of the Adulteration of Coffee by means of Chicory— The Motion is opposed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and rejected after a debate by 5 votes only-On a second attempt with the same view, Mr. T. Baring is outvoted by 199 to 122. Malt Tax.-Repeal of that Duty moved by Mr. CayleyHis Speech -He is supported by Mr. Disraeli and other Members of the Agricultural Party-The Chancellor of the Exchequer and Lord John Russell resist the Motion, which is rejected by 258 to 122—Mr. Bass afterwards moves that the Malt Duty be reduced one-halfThis also is negatived by the House-Mr. Frewen attempts a Repeal of the Hop Duty, but without success Lord Naas twice defeats the Government on his Motion with respect to the mode of levying Duties on Homemade Spirits in Bond; and Lord Robert Grosvernor once, upon a Proposition for repealing the Attorney's Certificate Duty— The Chancellor of the Exchequer ultimately succeeds in reversing the decisions as to both.

WE

E have already described the sistently with the maintenance of

very unfavourable reception public credit, and the establishthat was given to the first financial ments which were necessary for statement of the Chancellor of the the welfare of the country. The Exchequer, which, though not the all-pervading objection to his proavowed cause, was generally be- posals was that he had thought it lieved to have contributed in no necessary to retain some margin of small degree to the temporary ab- the surplus to meet sudden emerdication of the Whig Ministry. gencies—a policy the wisdom of On their resumption of office, it which had been verified by exfollowed, in accordance with the perience—and to maintain the prevailing expectation, that the public credit. He saw no reason financial schemes of the Govern- to alter his estimate of financial ment underwent a reconsideration, receipts, or of the disposable surand a remodelled budget was pro- plus; with this surplus he did duced, which avoided some of the not attempt to effect any great principal objections to the ori- operations, but in fact the great ginal propositions.

monopolies had been already deOn the 5th of April Sir Charles stroyed. The principle which had Wood submitted his amended actuated all his schemes was the plans to the House. He began desire to relieve and benefit the by saying that time had been great mass of the population, Goafforded him to reconsider the pro. vernment being instituted for the posals he had made to the House, benefit of the many and not of the and he had had the advantage of few. It was for their sakes that hearing the course of financial he had supported the remission of policy which Lord Stanley was pre- the duties on corn, meat, foreign pared to pursue. The two propo- cattle, and foreign sugar. With sals were before the country, which the same view of cheapening their could decide which of the two was provisions and their clothing, he most conducive to the welfare of had advocated the reduction of this great empire. He admitted duties on raw materials. There that his proposals had not given still remained one matter of vital general satisfaction, but he had importance to the poorer classesbeen surprised at the manner in their dwellings. It was with the which they had been received in view of improving their condition some quarters. The main demand in these respects that the duty on made upon him had been for a re- bricks was abolished in the premission of taxation to which he ceding session, and that it was felt it impossible to accede con- now proposed to reduce the duty CHAPTER IV.

FINANCE.The Chancellor of the Exchequer makes his second Financial

Statement for the Year, on the 5th of AprilHe explains at length the motives which had influenced him in making his Propositions to the House, and the subsequent modifications in his PlansHe proposes a total Repeal of the Window Tax in lieu of the Alteration before propounded, and retracts some of the boons to the Agricultural Interest which had been ungraciously received— The Budget meets with a more favourable reception than the former one. THE INCOME TAX.-Mr. Herries moves a Resolution directed to an alleviation of that ImpostHe is answered by the Chancellor of the Exchequer-Speeches of Mr. Prinsep, Mr. F. Peel, Mr. T. Baring, Mr. J. Wilson, Sir R. Inglis, and other Members— Mr. Herries's Resolution is rejected on a division by 278 against 230— The Second Reading of the Income Tax Bill is opposed by Mr. Spooner and Mr. Muntz, but without effectOn the Bill going into Committee, Mr. Hume moves that the Grant be limited to one year, with the object of having the whole subject considered in a Select Committee The Amendment is opposed by the Government, also by Mr. Cobden and Mr. Sidney Herbert - It is supported by Alderman Thompson, Mr. Miles, and Mr. Disraeli, and is carried by 244 to 230, amidst great cheering from the OppositionA few days afterwards, Lord John Russell declares the intention of the Government to acquiesce in the Amendment-Remarks of Mr. Disraeli - Mr. Hume experiences much difficulty in nominating a Select Committee on the Income Tax-Discussion as to the object of the Amendment, and the motives of those who had supported it-Remarks of Lord John Russell and Sir C. WoodA Committee is at length nominated. PROTECTIONIST FINANCE.On the 30th of June Mr. Disraeli moves certain Resolutions respecting the Financial Position and Prospects of the Country, and the Policy of the GovernmentHis Speech-He is answered by the Chancellor of the ExchequerSpeeches of Mr. Neredegate, Mr. Labouchere, Mr. Hume, and other MembersThe Resolutions are negatived by a majority of 113. ALTERATION OF DUTIES ON COFFEE AND TIMBER.— The former opposed by Mr. E. H. Stanley, but agreed to by the House- Mr. T. Baring moves a Resolution condemnatory of the Adulteration of Coffee by means of Chicory-The Motion is opposed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and rejected after a debate by 5 votes only-On a second attempt with the same view, Mr. T. Baring is outvoted by 199 to 122. Malt Tax.— Repeal of that Duty moved by Mr. CayleyHis Speech -He is supported by Mr. Disraeli and other Members of the Agricultural Party- The Chancellor of the Exchequer and Lord John Russell

[ocr errors][merged small]

on foreign timber. So far as the had so urged him on this subject ? country labourers were concerned, Not that they came to ask a rethat relief might be deemed com- mission of pounds, shillings, and plete; but there was another class pence, but to ask the removal of a which still required consideration burden affecting the dwellings of -he meant that part of the labour- the poor, and one which pressed uning population who were cooped fairly on the assessment of houses. up in dark and unwholesome The principle of an uniform tax dwellings in the towns. Sir C. on old and new houses was unWood referred in some detail to doubtedly the just one; but no unithe evidence which had been eli- form rate would give anything like cited by inquiries on this subject. equal relief. Sir Charles Wood It had been his endeavour, in his therefore proposed to omit all reformer propositions, to remove the ference to the number of windows evil so much complained of, and, -leaving it out of consideration so far as financial measures could what number of windows or openeffect that object, to improve the ings there might be, and getting rid sanitary condition of the poor by of every objection which could be allowing the free admission of stated upon sanitary grounds, and light and air into their dwellings. affording great relief to all or This measure, at least, he still nearly all parties. “I

propose to hoped to carry. Referring next take a uniform rate of 9d. upon to the subject of coffee, Sir C. dwelling-houses, and 6d. upon Wood said that it was impossible those houses which contain shops. to meet the incessant complaints It will be remembered that I promade of its adulteration by send- posed before, as to new houses, that ing an army of excisemen into all a duty of Is. in the pound should the grocers' shops, but he had pro- be imposed upon dwelling-houses, , posed to meet the evil in the most and a lower rate of duty upon legitimate way, by reducing the those dwelling-houses a portion of duty and cheapening the price of which was used as shops, or which the imported article. With regard were occupied by innkeepers, or to the reductions of the local charges used as farm-houses. Shops pay for lunatic asylums, and of the duty at present a lower rate, and I proon agricultural seeds, so much ob- pose to continue that distinction. jection had been made against them The duty which I shall propose by those for whose benefit they were will be an uniform rate upon all intended, that he should not at- houses, old and new, of 9d. in the tempt to force them upon parties pound upon their annual value, who repudiated the favour. and 6d. upon any house a part of

Sir Charles Wood then pro which is a shop, or which is oecuceeded to explain his intentions as pied by a victualler or held for the to the Window Tax. A loud de- occupation of land. It will be remand had been made on him for an membered that I proposed to unconditional repeal of the Win. exempt from taxation altogether dow Tax : it was enough for him to all houses not exceeding 201. in answer, that the Window Duty was annual value; I propose to retain 1,856,0001., and the surplus that exemption." In this way, they 1,892,0001. What had been the would get rid of all reference to language of the deputations who windows in any shape whatsoever;

« ForrigeFortsett »