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a Division, the Motion is defeated by 230 to 19. THE I--Interesting Statement made by Lord Palmerston re

wogress made towards its Suppression-Remarks of Sir wton and Mr. Hutt. STATE PROSECUTIONS OF THE NEAPO**FRNMENT--Publication of Mr. Gladstone's Letters to the Iberdeen-Strong public interest and sympathy excited by statures---Sir De Lacy Evans questions the Government on the or the House of Commons--Answer of Lord Palmerston, and * * by him in reference to Mr. Gladstone's Pamphlet.

IN of Ceylon, and the nion that the execution of eighteen opy of mal-administration persons, and the transportation,

winst Lord Torrington imprisonment, and corporal punishsernment of that island, ment of one hundred and fifty

occupied a prominent persons, by military tribunals, for 's the parliamentary pro- alleged offences after those dis" of the two preceding turbances had been suppressed **re in this session again (during which one individual only

subject of warm discus- of Her Majesty's troops had been d at length finally dis- slightly injured), is at variance

Considerable delays had with the merciful administration in prosecuting the inquiry of the British penal laws, and is I to the Select Committee not calculated to insure the future 11ouse of Commons ; partly affections and fidelity of Her Matavoidable causes, the dis- jesty's Colonial subjects.

the scene, and the absence "3. That this House is therefore necessary witnesses; partly, of opinion, that the conduct of : adversaries of the ex-Go- Earl Grey, in signifying Her Ma.

alleged, from obstacles jesty's unqualified approbation of .. in the way of investigation Lord Torrington's administration

Colonial Office at home. At of Ceylon, has been precipitate ly period of the present ses- and injudicious, tending to estahowever, Mr. Henry Baillie, blish precedents of rigour and bad been the Chairman of the severity in the government of Her •t Committee, gave notice of Majesty's foreign possessions, and intention to move the following injurious to the character of this olutions :

country for justice and humanity.' * 1. That this House, having Circumstances, which arose in sken into consideration the evi- part out of the Ministerial crisis deis nice adduced before the Select scribed in a former chapter of this committee appointed to inquire volume, led to the postponement into the grievances complained of of Mr. Baillie's motion, which did in the Crown colony of Ceylon, is not come on for discussion till the of opinion that the punishment of 28th of May. Meanwhile, Lord the natives of that island impli- Torrington, feeling the painful precated in the disturbances of 1848 dicament in which his political has been excessive and unneces- reputation was placed, determined sarily severe.

to vindicate his own conduct by “ 2. That this House is of opi- stating his version of the trans. CHAPTER V.

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL AFFAIRS--Ceylon, and the Charges against Lord

Torrington--Notice of Resolutions censuring the Conduct of that Nobleman and of Earl Grey given by Mr. Baillie-Lord Torrington enters into a detailed Explanation of his own Conduct in the House of Lords-Remarks of Earl Grey and of the Duke of Wellington Important Debate on Mr. Baillie's Motion continued for two Nights Speeches of Serjeant Murphy, Mr. Ker Seymer, Mr. Roebuck, Mr. Hume, Sir James Hogi, Sir F. The siger, Mr. Hares, Mr. Gladstone, the Attorney-General, Lord John Russell, and Mr. Disraeli

Mr. Baillie's Resolutions are negatired by a Majority of 82. COLO. xial EXPENDITURE AND SELF-Government-Sir William Molesworth moves Resolutions in farour of a Reduction of the former, and an Extension of the latter to the British Colonies---His able and comprehensive Speech-He is anstered by Mr. Hares-Speeches of Mr. Adderley, Air. Cobden, and Lord John Russeld— The Debate is a journed, and is not afterwards resumed. AFFAIRS OF THE Cape COLONY--Political Agitation and Discontent in that Settlement, and reneral of the hair War ---Debates in Parliament on these subjects--- Mr. Adderley moves an Address to the Crown, praying that a Commission may be sent out to inquire into the Relations between the British Government and the kafir Tribes--His Speech-Lord John Russell moves as an Amendment, that a Select Committee be appointed with the same abjectSpeeches of Mr. Vernon Smith, Mr. F. Scott, Mr. Gladstone, Mr. Roe buck, Mr. Labouchere, Mr. Sidney Herbert, and other Members-The Amendment is carried by 128 to 60– Further Discussions in the House of Lords, and in the House of Commons, on the rote being propused for the Expenses of the Kafir War in Committee of Supply - Important Debate on the Political Grierances of the Cape Colony in the House of Lords, on the Motion of the Earl of Derhy - He enters fully into the subjects of the Postponement of the promised Constitution, and the seniing of Conricts to the Cape-- Earl Grey defends his orn Policy- The Earl of Malmesbury, Lord Lyndhurst, Lord ('ranxorth, the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Araull, and the Duke of Nercastle, take part in the Discussion-Lord Derby's Motion for a Select Committee of Inquiry is negatired by 74 to 68. SIR JAMES BROOKE - Jr. Hume mores for an Inquiry into the Conduct of this Officer in reference to some of his operations against the Dhak Triles for alleged Piracy-- Mr. Headlam, Mr. H. Drummond, Mr. Molnes, and Lord Palmer om l'indicate Sir J. Brooke's Character-Nr. Cotaben supports the Metron - Mr. Gladstone discredite the personal Charges, but w in furour of

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Inquiry-On a Division, the Motion is defeated by 230 to 19. THE SLAVE TRADE-Interesting Statement made by Lord Palmerston respecting the progress made towards its Suppression-Remarks of Sir John Pakington and Mr. Hutt. STATE PROSECUTIONS OF THE NEAPOLITAN GOVERNMENT- - Publication of Mr. Gladstone's Letters to the Earl of Aberdeen Strong public interest and sympathy excited by these disclosures--Sir De Lacy Evans questions the Government on the subject in the House of CommonsAnswer of Lord Palmerston, and

steps taken by him in reference to Mr. Gladstone's Pamphlet. MAE affairs of Ceylon, and the nion that the execution of eighteen

charges of mal-administration persons, and the transportation, alleged against Lord Torrington imprisonment, and corporal punishin his government of that island, ment of one hundred and fifty which had occupied a prominent persons, by military tribunals, for space in the parliamentary pro- alleged offences after those disceedings of the two preceding turbances had been suppressed years, were in this session again (during which one individual only made the subject of warm discus- of Her Majesty's troops had been sion, and at length finally dis- slightly injured), is at variance posed of. Considerable delays had with the merciful administration arisen in prosecuting the inquiry of the British penal laws, and is referred to the Select Committee not calculated to insure the future of the House of Commons; partly affections and fidelity of Her Mafrom unavoidable causes, the dis- jesty's Colonial subjects. tance of the scene, and the absence "3. That this House is therefore of the necessary witnesses ; partly, of opinion, that the conduct of as the adversaries of the ex-Go- Earl Grey, in signifying Her Ma

vernor alleged, from obstacles jesty's unqualified approbation of thrown in the way of investigation Lord Torrington's administration by the Colonial Office at home. At of Ceylon, has been precipitate an early period of the present ses. and injudicious, tending to estasion, however, Mr. Henry Baillie, blish precedents of rigour and who had been the Chairman of the severity in the government of Her Select Committee, gave notice of Majesty's foreign possessions, and his intention to move the following injurious to the character of this resolutions :

country for justice and humanity." "1. That this House, having Circumstances, which arose in taken into consideration the evi. part out of the Ministerial crisis dedence adduced before the Select scribed in a former chapter of this Committee appointed to inquire volume, led to the postponement into the grievances complained of of Mr. Baillie's motion, which did in the Crown colony of Ceylon, is not come on for discussion till the of opinion that the punishment of 28th of May. Meanwhile, Lord the natives of that island impli- Torrington, feeling the painful precated in the disturbances of 1848 dicament in which his political has been excessive and unneces- reputation was placed, determined sarily severe.

to vindicate his own conduct by " 2. That this House is of opi- stating his version of the trans.

state.

actions in respect of which it had excess of expenditure over income, been impeached, in his place in the and that the revenue was falling; House of Lords. On the 1st of while cinnamon-gardens were beApril, the noble Lord moved that coming a wilderness, and cora“a message be sent to the House merce was in a most unsatisfactory of Commons for a copy of the

Within a week, on the 3rd Reports and Evidence of the Select of June, he had a report made to Committee on the affairs of Cey- him by the Auditor-General. That lon.” In making this motion the officer reported that the net deficit noble Lord observed, that he felt on the year was 74,8571. Lord compelled to call their Lordships' Torrington directed the issue of a attention to the subject in conse- circular letter instructing the heads quence of the postponement of Mr. of departments to reduce to the H. Baillie's notice of motion in the narrowest limit the expenditure at House of Commons, which left the disposal of each. He immehim no other means of meeting, diately laid before his Council all without delay, the calumnies be the papers intrusted to him; and had been exposed to.

three important measures

- the It would be his duty to prove, Custom House Bill, the Stamp Act, that in every act which took place and the Road Ordinance- were during his administration of the passed without a single word of government in Ceylon, he received opposition. The effect of the the advice and concurrence of his Customs Bill was to abolish exportExecutive Council; but he would duties, except that on cinnamon, go further, and show that not only which was reduced by two-thirds, the civil and military servants, but from 18. to 4d. the pound; to planters, merchants, and trades- equalise import duties, abolishing men, and even those who had been the differential; and to reduce summoned to give evidence against taxation by about 42,162. The him, had at various times during results were, that the coffee exthe transactions which had been ports mounted from 387,1501. in the subject of inquiry, concurred 1847, to 534,4561. in 1849; and in his policy. In every act he the cinnamon exports rose from acted constitutionally; and in dif- 49,1671. in 1847 to 73,3871. in ficult times he fairly did his duty. 1849. The Road Ordinance was

He divided the subject into passed with the unanimous concur. three distinct parts — first, the rence of the Council; and so far financial arrangements; second, was it from being distasteful to the the rebellion, its causes and its colonists, so strongly were the cosuppression ; third, the personal lonists satisfied of the benefits to allegations made against himself. result from the labour done under

He arrived in the colony on the it, that Lord Torrington had known 28th of May, 1847; carrying in- many to work double and treble structions that it was desirable to the time required of them by the increase the cultivation of coffee law. The gun-tax was a prudent and cinnamon in the island. It ordinance: at the end of the rehad been stated, that there was a bellion of 1818, the arms given up large surplus revenue; but he were not more than 10,000 at the found that there was a considerable utmost, two-thirds them old matchlocks in an unserviceable British goods and of every other state ; but in 1848 they had pro- article had increased; and inbably 80,000 stand of arms, many

dustrious habits had sprung up of them good muskets or English among the people. fowling-pieces : if they could afford He came now to the rebellion, dear guns, they could not complain and to the charges founded on it of a small tax. Other measures that he acted in an illegal manner. were the tax on hired carriages, on It was very different dealing with an shops, and on dogs. The two first Eastern population and an EuroLord Torrington thought might pean population: the treachery of form the foundation for raising the former might be inferred from in a large town a considerable the account by Major Davy of the revenue, lead to the introduc- murder of 200 English soldiers tion of municipal institutions, and immediately after the treaty deenable the residents to manage liberately made in 1818. It was their own lighting and general then thought that the loss of time rating. The increase of dogs in and men was brought about by an Eastern city was incredible to looking at matters too lightly in Europeans. It was against the re

the outset. Lord Torrington religion of the Buddhists to take life. called the circumstances under At one time in the year the which we obtained the government nuisance became so intolerable of the interior of the island. When that 6d. was offered for every head we took possession of Ceylon from of a dog, and the most brutal scenes the Dutch in 1796, we took the were enacted: the tax would repress maritime provinces only: the Kanthe increase of dogs. The result dyan country was a separate counof Lord Torrington's financial ma- try, left under the chiefs under nagement was to reduce the ex- their native king. In 1815 the penditure of the colony as follows: Kandyan country came under our -in 1847, 53,4411. 10s.; in 1848, dominion through a treaty-nego15,2231.; in 1849, 11,1151.; total, tiated, somewhat hastily and dis78,7801. expenditure in 1849 less advantageously, by Sir Robert than in 1846. In the first nine Brownrigg with the native chiefs, months of 1850, as compared with Unfortunately, the object of that the same period in 1849, a further treaty was understood in different reduction of 16,4081. was effected, senses by the parties to it. We exclusive of the road department. undertook to do all the duty apIn 1848 he was enabled to lay out pertaining to the King of Kandy: nearly 10,0001. more than was an- the chiefs thought they would 'conticipated in the repair and improve- tinue to govern the country as ment of roads and public works. they did under the former king, Even deducting the arrears, the and oppress the people and gather total revenue of the first half of their revenue as before; whereas 1848, compared with the same Sir Robert intended to govern the period of 1847, (when a reduction country as an English colony. That of taxation amounting to more original

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disaffection than 40,0001. was made,] exhibited caused the rebellion of 1818, which only a decrease of 35741. The took us two years to suppress and exports had increased to an enor- cost us a thousand men; as well as mous amount; the imports of the various rebellions which had

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