Treasures from the Prose Writings of John Milton

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Ticknor and Fields, 1866 - 486 sider

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Side 433 - At what instant I shall speak concerning a nation, and concerning a kingdom, to pluck up, and to pull down, and to destroy it; if that nation against whom I have pronounced, turn from their evil, I will repent of the evil that I thought to do unto them.
Side 94 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of triie virtue, which, being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Side 101 - I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors.
Side 35 - His word was in my heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones; I was weary with forbearing, and could not stay
Side 462 - The Tenure Of Kings And Magistrates: Proving, That it is Lawful!, and hath been held so through all Ages, for any, who have the Power, to call to account a Tyrant, or wicked King, and after due conviction, to depose, and put him to death; if the ordinary Magistrate have neglected, or deny'd to doe it.
Side 446 - And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again ; as it is also written in the second Psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee.
Side 453 - Create in me a clean heart, 0 God ; and renew a right spirit within me.
Side 120 - ... there must be many schisms and many dissections made in the quarry and in the timber ere the house of God can be built. And when every stone is laid artfully together, it cannot be united into a continuity, it can but be contiguous in this world. Neither can every piece of the building be of one form; nay, rather the perfection consists in this, that out of many moderate varieties and brotherly dissimilitudes that are not vastly disproportional, arises the goodly and the graceful symmetry that...
Side 122 - ... is so sprightly up, as that it has not only wherewith to guard well its own freedom and safety, but to spare and to bestow upon the solidest and sublimest points of controversy, and new invention, it betokens us not degenerated, nor drooping to a fatal decay...
Side 431 - But this I confess unto thee, that after the way which they call heresy, so worship I the God of my fathers...

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