The important and eventful trial of Queen Caroline, consort of George IV for "adulterous intercourse" with Bartolomo Bergami, Deler 1-2

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Side 475 - ... nature has not made us suitable to each other. Tranquil and comfortable society is, however, in our power ; let our intercourse, therefore, be restricted to that, and I will distinctly subscribe to the condition which you required, through Lady Cholmondeley, that even in the event...
Side 419 - Lordships — but surely of that it is scarcely necessary to remind you — that an advocate in the discharge of his duty knows but one person in all the world, and that person is his client. To save that client by all means and expedients, and at all hazards and costs to other persons, and...
Side 919 - Wherefore, that here we may briefly end, of Law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Side 904 - Form a strong line about the silver bound, And guard the wide circumference around. 'Whatever spirit, careless of his charge, His post neglects, or leaves the fair at large, Shall feel sharp vengeance soon o'ertake his...
Side 13 - ... better part of their incomes. " If, contrary to all expectation, there should be found, in some Peers, likely to amount to a majority, a disposition to reject the bill, some of these Peers may be ordered away to their ships, regiments, governments, and other duties ; and, which is an equally alarming power, new Peers may be created for the purpose, and give their vote in the decision. That your Majesty's ministers would advise these measures, if found necessary, to render their prosecution successful,...
Side 5 - ... of the House of Commons, and sparing this House the painful necessity of those public discussions, which, whatever might be their ultimate result, could not but be distressing to her majesty's feelings — disappointing to the hopes of parliament — derogatory from the dignity of the crown — and injurious to the best interests of the empire.
Side 916 - Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted by the King's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal...
Side 419 - ... hazards and costs to other persons, and, among them, to him*self, is his first and only duty; and in performing this duty he must not regard the alarm, the torments, the destruction which he may bring upon others. Separating the duty of a patriot from that of an advocate^ he must go on reckless of consequences, though it should be his unhappy fate to involve his country in confusion.
Side 14 - If my life would have satisfied your Majesty, you should have had it on the sole condition of giving me a place in the same tomb with my child ; but, since you would send me dishonoured to the grave, I will resist the attempt with all the means that it shall please God to give me.
Side 869 - But to any man who could even be suspected of so base a practice as whispering calumnies to judges — distilling leprous venom into the ears of jurors — the Queen might well exclaim, ' Come forth, thou slanderer, and let me see thy face ! If thou would'st equal the respectability...

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