The Faroe Islands: Interpretations of History

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University Press of Kentucky, 1987 - 257 sider
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Innhold

Norse Settlement to Danish Monopoly
7
Church King Company and Country The Reformation and Its Aftermath 15401709
20
Outside the Wall SeventeenthCentury Society in Legend
41
Toward a National Cultural in an Odd Danish Province
65
What Better Thing? The Copenhagen Connection 18141855
89
The Transition from Monopoly Social Change in the Faroes 18561920
113
Now the Hour is Come to Hand Culture and Politics circa 18901920
139
Specters and Illusions The World Abroad and the World at Home
173
Governance and Governors
199
Notes
205
References
231
Index
249
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Side 4 - The whig interpretation of history". . . is the tendency in many historians to write on the side of Protestants and Whigs, to praise revolutions provided they have been successful, to emphasise certain principles of progress in the past and to produce a story which is the ratification if not the glorification of the present.
Side 7 - There is another set of small islands, nearly all separated by narrow stretches of water; in these for nearly a hundred years hermits sailing from our own country, Ireland, have lived.
Side 7 - And just as they were always deserted from the beginning of the world, so now because of the Northmen pirates they are emptied of anchorites, and filled with countless sheep, and very many diverse kinds of seabirds.
Side 7 - Thule] in the ocean to the north of Britain which can be reached from the northern islands of Britain in a direct voyage of two days and nights with sails filled with a continuously favourable wind. A devout priest told me that in two summer days and the intervening night he sailed in a two-benched boat and landed on one of them.
Side 8 - ... dependencies, was subsumed under a joint Danish-Norwegian crown. The most important of these dependencies was Iceland, which had given up its freedom in 1262. The Faroese had already been subject to the Norwegian crown for over two hundred years. Orkney became Scottish in 1468, Shetland in 1472. By the time of the Reformation, in the middle of the sixteenth century, the Faroes were a small and rather unimportant part of an already much diminished Norse world, whose society had developed a good...

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