History of Europe from the commencement of the French revolution ... to the restoration of the Bourbons

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Side 253 - Lord Nelson has been commanded to spare Denmark, when she no longer resists. The line of defence which covered her shores has struck to the British flag : but if the firing is continued on the part of Denmark, he must set on fire all the prizes that he has taken, without having the power of saving the men who have so nobly defended them.
Side 20 - Soldiers! you have gained, in fifteen days, six victories, taken one-andtwenty standards, fifty-five pieces of cannon, many strong places, and conquered the richest part of Piedmont ; you have made fifteen thousand prisoners, killed or wounded ten thousand men.
Side 225 - Nor would he suffer his own wound to be examined till every man who had been previously wounded was properly attended to. Fully believing that the wound was mortal, and that he was about to die, as he had ever desired, in battle and in victory, he called the chaplain and desired him to deliver what he supposed to be his dying remembrance to Lady Nelson ; he then sent for...
Side 102 - The last and distinguishing feature is a perfidy which nothing can bind, which no tie of treaty, no sense of the principles generally received among nations, no obligation, human or divine, can restrain. Thus qualified, thus armed for destruction, the genius of the French Revolution marched forth, the terror and dismay of the world. Every nation has in its turn been the witness, many have been the...
Side 205 - Soldiers ! You are one of the wings of the Army of England ; you have made war in mountains, plains, and cities ; it remains to make it on the ocean. The Roman legions, whom you have often imitated, but not yet equalled, combated Carthage, by turns, on the seas and on the plains of Zama. Victory never deserted their standards, because they never ceased to be brave, patient, and united. Soldiers ! the eyes of Europe are upon you; you have great destinies to accomplish, battles to fight, dangers and...
Side 224 - This tremendous explosion was followed by a silence not less awful : the firing immediately ceased on both sides, and the first sound which broke the silence was the dash of her shattered masts and yards, falling into the water from the vast height to which they had been exploded.
Side 19 - I will keep these fortresses, and march upon Turin. Meanwhile, I shall march to-morrow against Beaulieu, and drive him across the Po ; I shall follow close at his heels, overrun all Lombardy, and in a month be in the Tyrol, join the army of the Rhine, and carry our united forces into Bavaria. That design is worthy of you, of the army, and of the destinies of France. If you continue your confidence in me, I shall answer for the results, and Italy is at your feet.
Side 251 - I have only one eye — I have a right to be blind sometimes...
Side 225 - When the surgeon came in due time to examine his wound, (for it was in vain to entreat him to let it be examined sooner,) the most anxious silence prevailed ; and the joy of the wounded men, and of the whole crew, when they heard that the hurt was merely superficial, gave Nelson deeper pleasure, than the unexpected assurance that his life was in no danger.
Side 94 - ... protracted, and, in more than one instance, renewed. The same system, to the prevalence of which France justly ascribes all her present miseries, is that which has also involved the rest of Europe in a long and destructive warfare, of a nature long since unknown to the practice of civilized nations.

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