The Cambridge Examiner

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J. Palmer
 

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Side 278 - Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid, his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great when some great occasion is presented to him.
Side 105 - Not that fair field Of Enna, where Proserpine gathering flowers, Herself a fairer flower by gloomy Dis Was gathered, which cost Ceres all that pain To seek her through the world...
Side 199 - In at the window climbs, or o'er the tiles : So clomb this first grand thief into God's fold; So since into his church lewd hirelings climb. Thence up he flew; and on the Tree of Life, The middle tree and highest there that grew, Sat like a cormorant...
Side 278 - Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began. Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And even his failings leaned to virtue's side ; But, in his duty prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt, for all...
Side 76 - If a straight line be divided into two equal parts, and also into two unequal parts, the rectangle contained by the unequal parts, together with the square on the line between the points of section, is equal to the square on half the line.
Side 59 - For neither man nor angel can discern Hypocrisy, the only evil that walks Invisible, except to God alone, By his permissive will, through heaven and earth: And oft, though Wisdom wake, Suspicion sleeps At Wisdom's gate, and to Simplicity Resigns her charge, while Goodness thinks no ill Where no ill seems...
Side 121 - If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of the...
Side 322 - From their Creator, and transgress His will, For one restraint, lords of the world besides? Who first seduced them to that foul revolt ? Th
Side 150 - Like to the senators of the antique Rome, With the plebeians swarming at their heels, Go forth and fetch their conquering Caesar in : As, by a lower but loving likelihood, Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in good time he may, from Ireland coming, Bringing rebellion broached on his sword, How many would the peaceful city quit, To welcome him ! much more, and much more cause, Did they this Harry.
Side 11 - Muse to venture down The dark descent, and up to re-ascend, Though hard and rare.

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