Niles' National Register, Volum 12

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385
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Populære avsnitt

Side 42 - ... a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it, accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can, in any event, be abandoned...
Side 51 - ... vessel shall not be employed by such owners to cruise or commit hostilities against the subjects, citizens, or property, of any foreign Prince or State, or of any colony, district, or people, with whom the United States are at peace.
Side 295 - The freemen of America did not wait till usurped power had strengthened itself by exercise and entangled the question in precedents. They saw all the consequences in the principle ; and they avoided the consequences by denying the principle. We revere this lesson too much soon to forget it...
Side 42 - This within certain limits is probably true, and in governments of a monarchical cast patriotism may look with indulgence, if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in those of the popular character in governments purely elective it is a spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency it is certain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose, and there being constant danger of excess the effort ought to be by force of public opinion to mitigate and assuage...
Side 223 - A Course of Instruction in the Elements of the Art and Science of War, for the Use of the Cadets of the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY 12mo, cloth $1 .75 Field Fortifications.
Side 296 - Because it will have a like tendency to banish our citizens. The allurements presented by other situations are every day thinning their number. To superadd a fresh motive to emigration by revoking the liberty which they now enjoy, would be the same species of folly which has dishonored and depopulated flourishing kingdoms.
Side 19 - Our land and naval forces should be moderate, but adequate to the necessary purposes. The former to garrison and preserve our fortifications, and to meet the first invasions of a foreign foe ; and, while constituting the elements of a greater force, to preserve the...
Side 142 - that the laws of the several states, except where the Constitution, treaties or statutes of the United States shall otherwise require or provide, shall be regarded as rules of decision in trials at common law in the courts of the United States in cases where they apply.
Side 295 - It is the duty of every man to render to the Creator such homage, and such only, as he believes to be acceptable to him. This duty is precedent, both in order of time and in degree of obligation, to the claims of civil society. Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the universe : and if a member of civil society who enters into any subordinate association must •ja., par.
Side 19 - Invasions may be made too formidable to be resisted by any land and naval force which it would comport either with the principles of our Government or the circumstances of the United States to maintain. In such cases recourse must be had to the great body of the People and in a manner to produce the best effect. It is of the highest importance, therefore, that they be so organized and trained as to be prepared for any emergency. The arrangement should be such as to put at the command of the Government...

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