Ports and Docks: Their History, Working, and National Importance

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Methuen, 1904 - 179 sider

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Side 52 - The Trinity House" shall mean the master, wardens, and assistants of the guild, fraternity, or brotherhood of the most glorious and undivided Trinity and of St. Clement in the parish of Deptford Strond, in the county of Kent...
Side 59 - The Earl of Chatham, with his sword drawn Stood waiting for Sir Richard Strachan ; Sir Richard, longing to be at 'em, Stood waiting for the Earl of Chatham.
Side 78 - ... as near as they could guess, which lay in the water as upon the earth, without moving this way or that. Dishes, likewise, and wooden buckets, they set a swimming ; but it proved a stilling, for move they would not any way, by force of stream or water, so that it seemed the water was indeed asleep or dead, or had changed or borrowed the stability of the earth. ' The watermen, not content with this evidence, would needs make the utmost of the...
Side 3 - ... and of many a gallant fight which has brought us an undying fame. For our language is impregnated with the salt of the sea, and with the slang of the ship. And though many of such expressions are now used in forgetfulness of their nautical origin, there still remain plenty which need no interpreter, even though altered conditions may have robbed them of much of their original force and truth. ' Any port in a storm,' for example, was, in the case of the ships of ancient times, a proposition of...
Side 15 - I and other distant ports, London's average is only 878 tons, as against Liverpool's 1,867 tons. Glasgow's average, like that of Liverpool, is also * Ie, August, 1903. high — 1,471 tons. Hull, whose trade, still more than London's, is with European ports, has an average of only 802 tons. Liverpool's import tonnage, though by no means entirely attributable to her trade with the New World, is largely so accounted for, almost all the cotton from the States coming to the Mersey ; whilst the frequent...
Side 78 - ... an hour very near ; their boats not so much as moved through any way, either upward or downward, the water seeming as plain, quiet, even and stable as a pavement under the arch where, if anywhere in the Thames, there must be moving, by reason of the narrowness of the place.
Side 70 - AS the Ships in the Employ of the East India Company are of a larger Size than other Vessels employed by Merchants in Trade, and many of them nearly equal in Bulk to Ships of the Line in the Royal Navy...
Side 79 - Greenwich, when it was heard so, nof onely clearly, but fearfully to the bridge ; and up he comes tumbling, roaring, and foaming in that furious manner, that it was horror unto all that beheld it. And as it gave sufficient notice to the eare of its comming, so it left sufficient satisfaction to the eye, that it was now come, having raised the water foure foote higher than the first tyde had done, foure foote by rule ! as by evident measure did appear, and presently ebbed in as hasty, confused, unaccustomed...

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