The Golden Bowl

Front Cover, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
119 Reviews
Henry James's 1904 novel "The Golden Bowl" is the story of Prince Amerigo, an impoverished but charismatic Italian nobleman who travels to London to marry Maggie Verver, only child of the wealthy American financier and art collector, Adam Verver. While in London, Prince Amerigo meets his former mistress, Charlotte Stant, and the two are soon engaged in an adulterous affair. Considered by some to be the last work of Henry James's "major phase", "The Golden Bowl" is a complex examination of marriage and adultery.

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One of the best works in prose, ever - Goodreads
The plot is a convoluted story of adultery. - Goodreads
Another 5-star yarn from this Henry James guy. - Goodreads
James' writing style, for me, was a beating. - Goodreads
His prose is as wonderful as his sensibility. - Goodreads
Let me begin by writing that I am not a big James fan. - Goodreads

Review: The Golden Bowl

User Review  - Nikita Jain - Goodreads

All I can say for this little piece is : Do not be dismayed and discouraged by the first 150 pages, there's more, more to it than you wanted or at least expected to find. Less conversations, more imagery. There is definitely a light at the end of the tunnel. Read full review

Review: The Golden Bowl

User Review  - David Moulton - Goodreads

Generally speaking Henry James was not a novelist of ideas. Later on, however, his prose style would grow into a philosophy unto itself. The Golden Bowl is the apotheosis of late James. In many ways ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

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