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Ay, 'twas but a dream, for now there's no retreating,
If I cease Harlequin, I cease from eating.
Twas thus that Æsop's stag, a creature blameless,
Yet something vain, like one that shall be nameless,
Once on the margin of a fountain stood,
And cavilld at his image in the flood.
“ The deuce confound,” he cries, “ these drumstick

shanks,
They never have my gratitude nor thanks ;
They're perfectly disgraceful! strike me dead !
But for a head, yes, yes, I have a head.
How piercing is that eye! how sleek that brow!
My horns !- I'm told horns are the fashion now."
Whilst thus he spoke, astonish’d, to his view,
Near, and more near, the hounds and huntsmen drew;
Hoicks! hark forward ! came thund'ring from behind,
He bounds aloft, outstrips the fleeting wind :
He quits the woods, and tries the beaten ways;
He starts, he pants, he takes the circling maze.
At length, his silly head, so priz'd before,
Is taught his former folly to deplore ;
Whilst his strong limbs conspire to set him free,
And at one bound he saves himself, like me.

[Taking a jump through the stage door.

Ꭰ Ꭱ Ꭺ Ꮇ A S.

VOL. IV.

M

THE

GOOD-NATURED MAN;

CO) ME DY:

AS PERFORMED AT TIE

THEATRE-ROYAL, COVENT GARDEN.

[The “Good-Natured Man” was first performed at Covent Garden Theatre on the 29th of January 1768. Goldsmith seems to have taken the hint of the character from whom the play is named from the lover of the unfortunate Miss Braddock, in his own Life of Beau Nash, see vol. iii.

p.

295. “ Dr. Johnson," says Boswell, “ pronounced it to be the best comedy that had appeared since ‘The Provoked Husband,' and declared that there had not been of late any such character exhibited on the stage as that of Croaker. I observed, it was the Suspirius of his Rambler. He said Goldsmith had owned he had borrowed it from thence."-See Life, ch. xvii.]

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