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SONGS,

CHIEFLY SCOTTISH.

I.

'A ROSE-BUD BY MY EARLY WALK.

TUNE- The Shepherd's Wife.
A ROSE-BUD by my early walk,
Adown a corn-enclosed bawk,
Sae gently hent its thorny stalk,

All ou a dewy morning.

Ere twice the shades o' dawn are fled,
In a’ its crimson glory spread,
And drooping rich the dewy head,

It scents the early morning.

Within the bush, her covert nest
A little linnet fondly prest;
The dew sat chilly on her breast

Sae early in the morning.

She soon shall see her tender brood,
The pride, the pleasure o' the wood,
Amang the fresh green leaves bedew'd,

Awake the early morning.

So thou, dear bird, young Jeany fair,
On trembling string or vocal air,
Shall sweetly pay the tender care

That tents thy early morning.

So thou, sweet rose-bud, young and gay,
Shalt beauteous blaze upon the day,
And bless the parent's evening ray

That watch'd thy early morning.

II.

THE FAREWELL, TO THE BRETHREN OF ST.

JAMES'S LODGE, TARBOLTON.
TUNE_Guid night, and joy be wi' you a'.
ADIEU! a heart-warm, fond adieu !

Dear brothers of the mystic tie!
Ye favour'd, ye enlighten'd few,

Companions of my social joy!
Tho’I to foreign lands must hie,

Pursuing Fortune's sliddery ba',
With melting heart, and brimful eye,

I'll mind you still, tho' far awa.

Oft have I met your social band,

And spent the cheerful, festive night;
Oft, honour'd with supreme command,

Presided o'er the sons of light :
And by that hieroglyphic bright,

Which none but craftsmen ever saw!
Strong memory on my heart shall write

Those happy scenes when far awa.

May freedom, harmony, and love,

Unite you in the grand design, Beneath th' omniscient eye above,

The glorious Architect divine ! That you may keep th' unerring line,

Still rising by the plummet's law, Till order bright completely shine,

Shall be my prayer when far awa.

And you, farewell! whose merits claim,

Justly, that highest badge to wear! Heaven bless your honour'd, noble name,

To Masonry and Scotia dear!
A last request permit me here,

When yearly ye assemble a',
One round, I ask it with a tear,

To him, the Bard that's far awa.

INI.

FARE THEE WEEL.

Ae fond kiss, and then we sever;
Ae fareweel, alas, for ever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee.
Who shall say that fortune grieves him
While the star of hope she leaves him ?
Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me;
Dark despair around benights me.

I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy,
Naething could resist my Nancy:
But to see her, was to love her ;
Love but her, and love for ever.
Had we never loved sae kindly,
Had we never loved sae blindly,
Never metấor never parted,
We had ne'er been broken-hearted.

Fare thee weel, thou first and fairest.!
Fare thee weel, thou best and dearest !
Thine be ilka joy and treasure,
Peace, enjoyment, love, and pleasure !
Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ; .
Ae fareweel, alas! for ever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thec.

IV.

GLOOMY DECEMBER.

Ance mair I hail thee, thou gloomy December!

Ance mair I hail thee wi' sorrow and care; Sad was the parting thou makes me remember,

Parting wi’ Nancy, 0! ne'er to meet mair. Fond lovers' parting is sweet painful pleasure,

Hope beaming mild on the soft parting hour; But the dire feeling, O farewell for ever,

Js anguish unmingled and agony pure.

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