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Little additional is there now to be said as to the smooth fox terrier, and my general experience of him as a dog is, that properly trained and entered he cannot yet be beaten. Of course, there are softhearted fox terriers as there are pointers and setters that may be gun-shy, but such are as much the exception in one case as the other. That he is so little used in actual fox hunting is a matter to deplore. Some time ago, when reading that volume of the Badminton Library which deals with hunting, I was mightily surprised to see so little allusion to terriers. Yet the writer, the Duke of Beaufort, is a hunting man, one who loves to hear his hounds singing in their kennels at night, and is never so happy as when the favourite flowers of his pack are making it warm for bold reynard across the meadows of the Midlands. Terriers are only mentioned three times throughout the volume—in one place where they are recommended as assistants to harriers when trying along a hedgerow, again, as likely to be useful to the earthstopper, and on a third occasion as requisites for otter hunting. This neglect notwithstanding, a good fox terrier can still be useful in driving a fox from a drain, and our modern strains might do their duty as well as the best that ever ran between John o'Groats and Land's End. When once properly entered, a fox terrier never seems happy until he gets it—the fox—driven from his lurking place underground. Much more—very much more—could be written of the fox terrier, especially as to his work, but those who think I have not said enough must refer back to the “History of the Fox Terrier,” already alluded to. That he will do his work after game underground goes without saying, and he has been trained by one of the modern electric lighting companies to assist them in a part of their business, and I cannot better close my story of the fox terrier than by copying the following from a London newspaper : “The method adopted by the Crompton Electric Lighting Company in laying their connections consists in copper strips (technically known as the ‘strip') conducted along the whole of their system in culverts underground. It is necessary to carry these strips through the culverts in lengths of about 100 yards each, and they are laid four abreast. These strips are supported on transverse bars at intervals of Io yards. The difficulty and expense of laying these strips was a serious consideration for the company, until it occurred to the foreman of the works that a terrier might be trained to carry a guide rope along the culverts, to the end of which the strip could be attached, and then easily drawn through. He had in his possession a fox terrier about nine months old, which he immediately began to train for the business. To induce a terrier to travel IOO yards underground is not such a very difficult task, but it must be remembered that at every 10 yards came the transverse supports, and it was necessary for her to jump over these every time until she could be depended upon to jump over every support without fail, else she was useless for the work in hand, and herein lay the great difficulty in her education. However, by patience and perseverance on the part of her master, aided by the naturally honourable disposition of Strip, perfection was reached, and she never makes a single mistake In OW. “Working in the dark culverts she can be implicitly trusted to assist the company in her department, and has laid many miles of wires both in London and Brighton. And the company, recognising the value of a good servant, pay her fair wages, which she receives every Saturday morning along with other employés of the company.”

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