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CHAPTER XV. YORKSHIRE AND OTHER TOY TERRIERS.

THE charming, aristocratic little dog we now know as the Yorkshire terrier has been identified as such for but a comparatively short period, the Kennel Club adopting this nomenclature in their Stud Book for 1886. Prior to this date the name had been hanging about him for some few years, because the names of rough, broken-haired, or Scotch terrier, under which he was first known, were most misleading. During the early days of dog shows the classes in which he competed included terriers of almost any variety, from the cross-bred mongrel to the Dandie Dinmont, the Skye terrier, and the Bedlington. Indeed, twenty years since it was no uncommon sight to see wire-haired fox terriers figuring with others of a silkier coat under the one common head of “rough or broken-haired terriers.” As a fact, a broken-haired terrier should have been altogether a short-coated dog—the Yorkshire is long-coated to a greater extent than any other

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