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Quest House, St. Giles, Cripple-
gate, 55, 56

Rahere, founder of St. Bartholo-
mew's Priory and Hospital,
150, 152
Rainbow Tavern, Fleet Street,
172, 200, 202

Red Cow Public House, Hammer-
smith Road, 283
Reuss, Henry, Count, 169
Rich, first Lord, 151
Roman remains in London, 1, 2,
23, 47, 48, 111-114, 148, 250,
251

Rose Theatre, Southwark, 38
Rose Alley, 40

Sandford Manor House, 268-271
Sand's End or Sandy End, 268,
269

Saracen's Head Inn, Aldgate, 82
Sardinia Street, formerly Duke
Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields,
233, 240

St. Anne, Blackfriars, Church of,
117

St. Bartholomew, Priory of, 150,

151

St. Bartholomew the Great, West
Smithfield, Church of, 151

St. Bartholomew the Less, Church
of, 153

St. Clement Danes, Church of,
243, 244

St. George, Botolph Lane, Church
of, 129, 130

St. Giles, Cripplegate, Church of,
54-58

St. Helen, Bishopsgate St., Church
of, 65, 66

St. Mary le Strand, Church of,

243

St. Michael, Bassishaw, Church of,
126, 127

St. Michael, Wood St., Church of,
121-126

St. Mildred, Bread Street, Church
of, 128

St. Paul's Deanery, 104
St. Paul's Pier and Wharf, 101-103
Old house there, 101

St. Saviour's Church (now
Cathedral), Southwark, 45, 46
Savoy Chapel, 248
Scarsdale House, Kensington,
276, 277

Schomberg House, Piccadilly, 257
Scroope's Inn, 208

of

Seething Lane, Residence
Samuel Pepys in, 85
Serjeant's Inn, 207, 208
Shakespeare, Edmond or Edmund,

49

Shakespeare William, His refer-
ence to the White Hart Inn,
11

His residence in Southwark, 38
Connection with Globe Theatre,
38

Connection with Rose Theatre,
38

Falcon Tavern, 41
Reference to Crosby Place, 61
His probable residence in St.
Helen's Parish, 61

Connection with the Blackfriars
Theatre, 106

His house in Ireland Yard, 106,
118

His reference to "the Rose,"
St. Laurence Poultney, 133,
139

Quotation from his play of King
Henry IV. Part II., 180
Reference to Clement's Inn,
216

Sheppard, Jack, 242, 245
Shorter, Sir John, 152
Siddons, Mrs., 283
Sieve Tavern, Church Street,
Minories, 80, 81
Simpson's Tavern, Strand, 254
Six Bells Tavern, Chelsea, 264

Skinners' Company's Almshouses,

Mile End, 73, 74

Somers, first Lord, 237
Somerset House, Strand, 248
Sophia, Princess, 281
Southwark, 1-46
Spedding, James, 239
Spencer, Sir John, 61, 62
Stamford Bridge, 267

Stanfield, R. A., William Clarkson,

255

Staple Inn, 209-212
Steelyard, 128

Stews, Bankside, Southwark, 37,
39, 40

Stone, Nicholas, 256
Stow, John, Reference to South-
wark, from his "Survey," 1
His list of Southwark Inns, 3
On the Tabard, 5

On Goodman's Fields, 80
On Paul's Wharf, 102

On the Inns of Chancery, 205,
206
Strand, various old houses in the,
249-252

Strand Lane, Roman Bath, 250,
251
Suffolk, Charles Brandon, Duke
of, his mansion in Southwark,
29

Has a grant of Pulteney's Inn
or the "Manor of the Rose,"
139, 140

Suffolk Lane, No. 2, 97, 98
Suffolk Lane, Old house in, 97,

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Temple Bar, 176-179, 201
Temple, Inner, 204
Temple, Middle, 204
Tennyson, Alfred, 239, 240
Terrace, The, Kensington, 277
Thackeray, W. M., possible refer-
ence to Clement's Inn, 216
His reference to the "Cave of
Harmony," 253

To Kensington Square, 279
His residence in Young Street,
279

Thackeray, Miss (Mrs. Richmond
Ritchie), her reference to
Scarsdale House, 277
Thatched cottage near Paddington
Green, 284, 285

Thatched House Court, 252
Thavies Inn, 206

Thrale, Mr. and Mrs., 40, 249
Trinity Hospital, Mile End, 74
Turner, J. W. M., cottage in

Chelsea, where he died, 266

Victoria, H. M. Queen, 75, 177
Vine Tavern, Mile End, 75-77

Walpole, Sir Robert, 254, 258
Walter, Sir Edward, K.C.B., 252
Ward, first Lord, 25
Warde, Sir Patience, 141, 142
Waverley, Abbot of, 5, 24
Waxworks, Mrs. Salmon's, after-

wards Mrs. Clark's, 195-198
Wheatley and Cunningham's
London Past and Present, 164,
249
Whistler, J. A. M., at Lindsey
House, Chelsea, 170
In Cheyne Walk, 265
Whitechapel, 77, 78
White Hart Inn, Southwark, 3,

9-15

White Hart Yard, Brooke Street,
Holborn, 164

White Horse Cellars, Old and
New, Piccadilly, 167

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