Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

What trifles tease me now!
They swarm like summer flies,
They cleave to every thing I do,
And swim before my eyes.

How dull the Sabbath day,
Without the Sabbath's Lord!
How toilsome then to sing and pray,
And wait upon the word!

Of all the truths I hear,
How few delight my taste!
I glean a berry here and there,
But mourn the vintage past.

Yet let me (as I ought)
Still hope to be supplied;
No pleasure else is worth a thought,
Nor shall I be denied.

Though I am but a worm,
Unworthy of his care,
The Lord will my desire perform,
And grant me all my prayer.

XLII. SELF-ACQUAINTANCE.

Dear Lord ! accept a sinful heart, Which of itself complains,
And mourns with much and frequent smart, The evil it contains.

There fiery seeds of anger lurk,
Which often hurt my frame;

And wait but for the tempter's work,
To fan them to a flame.

Legality holds out a bribe
To purchase life from thee;

And discontent would fain prescribe
How thou shalt deal with me.

While unbelief withstands thy grace,

And puts the mercy by; Presumption, with a brow of brass,

Says, " Give me, or I die."

How eager are my thoughts to roam In quest of what they love!

But ah! when duty calls them home, How heavily they move!

Oh, cleanse me in a Saviour's blood,
Transform me by thy power,

And make me thy beloved abode,
And let me roam no more.

XLIII. PRAYER FOR PATIENCE.

Lord, who hast suffer'd all for me,
My peace and pardon to procure, The lighter cross I bear for thee,
Help me with patience to endure.

The storm of loud repining hush,
I would in humble silence mourn;

Why should the unburnt, though burning bush
Be angry as the crackling thorn?

Man should not faint at thy rebuke,

Like Joshua falling on his face,1 When the cursed thing that Achan took

Brought Israel into just disgrace.

Perhaps some golden wedge suppress'd,
Some secret sin offends my God;Perhaps that Babylonish vest,

Self-righteousness, provokes the rod.

Ah! were I buffeted all day,

Mock'd, crown'd with thorns, and spit upon; I yet should have no right to say,

My great distress is mine alone.

Let me not angrily declare

No pain was ever sharp like mine,

Nor murmur at the cross I bear, But rather weep, remembering thine.

XLIV. SUBMISSION.

O Lord, my best desire fulfil,

And help me to resign Life, health, and comfort to thy will, And make thy pleasures mine. 1 Joshua vii. 10, 11.

Why should I shrink at thy command,
Whose love forbids my fears?

Or tremble at the gracious hand
That wipes away my tears?

No, rather let me freely yield
What most I prize to thee;Who never hast a good withheld,
Or wilt withhold from me.

Thy favour, all my journey through,
Thou art engaged to grant;

What else I want or think I do,
'Tis better still to want.

Wisdom and mercy guide my way,

Shall I resist them both?
A poor blind creature of a day,

And crush'd before the moth!

But ah! my inward spirit cries,
Still bind me to thy sway;Else the next cloud that veils the skies,
Drives all these thoughts away.

XLV. THE HAPPY CHANGE.

How blest thy creature is, O God,
When, with a single eye, He views the lustre of thy word,
The dayspring from on high!

Through all the storms that veil the skies, And frown on earthly things, The Sun of Righteousness he eyes, With healing on his wings.

Struck by that light, the human heart,

A barren soil no more,
Sends the sweet smell of grace abroad,

Where serpents lurk'd before.1

The soul a dreary province once

Of Satan's dark domain,
Feels a new empire form'd within,

And owns a heavenly reign.

The glorious orb, whose golden beams

The fruitful year control,
Since first, obedient to thy word,

He started from the goal,

Has cheer'd the nations with the joys

His orient rays impart; But, Jesus, 'tis thy light alone

Can shine upon the heart.

XLVI. RETIREMENT.

Far from the world, O Lord, I flee, From strife and tumult far;
From scenes where Satan wages still His most successful war.

1 Isaiah xxxv. 7.

« ForrigeFortsett »