Deliciæ Britannicæ, Or, The Curiosities of Hampton-Court and Windsor-Castle, Delineated: With Occasional Reflections, and Embellished with Copper-plates of the Two Palaces, &c

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T. Cooper, 1742 - 203 sider
 

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Side 42 - In adamantine armour frown'd ; By him the childless goddess rose, Minerva, studious to compose Her twisted threads ; the web she strung, And o'er a loom of marble hung : Thetis, the troubled ocean's queen, Match'd with a mortal, next was seen, Reclining on a funeral urn, Her short-liv'd darling son to mourn. The last was he, whose thunder slew The Titan race, a rebel crew, That from a hundred hills ally'd In impious leagues their king defy'd.
Side 37 - Pow'r to act, is equal to thy Will. Nature and Art, in thee, alike contend, Not to oppofe each other, but befriend : For what thy Fancy has with Fire defign'd, Is by thy Skill, both temper'd and refin'd.
Side 40 - British coins shall live, To richest ores the value give, Or, wrought within the curious mould, Shape and adorn the running gold. To bear this form, the genial sun Has daily, since his course begun, Rejoiced the metal to refine, And ripen'd the Peruvian mine. Thou, Kneller...
Side 40 - And stampt on British coins shall live, To richest ores the value give, Or, wrought within the curious mould, Shape and adorn the running gold. To bear this form, the genial sun Has daily, since his course begun...
Side 156 - Jesus' disciple. He went to Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus. Then Pilate commanded the body to be delivered. And when Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn out in the rock; and he rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulchre, and departed. And there was Mary Magdalene, and the other Mary, sitting over against the sepulchre.
Side 102 - ... aflumes the honour of the victory ; whereas, in naval engagements, a fog, a calm, a wind, either contrary or tempeftuous, may oblige the victorious fleet to retire the firft.
Side 47 - Home to Flanders, with a Manner of Painting fo noble, natural, and eafy, that Titian himfelf was hardly his. Superior ; and no other Mafter in the World equal to him for Portraits. HE came into England foon after Rubens, left it and was retained in the Service of King Charles I.
Side 41 - Nassau here we find, And with him bright Maria join'd ; There Anna, great as when...
Side xi - Spain with the noblest pictures which are now remaining in the world. Ridolphi, in his Life of Titian, says, " That emperor one day took up a pencil which fell from the hand of that artist, who was then drawing his picture: and upon the compliment which Titian made him on this occasion, he said these words: — " Titian has deserved to be served by Caesar.
Side 40 - ... thy delusive hand, As in the presence-chamber stand. The magic of thy art calls forth His secret soul and hidden worth, His probity and mildness shows, His care of friends, and scorn of foes : In every stroke, in every line, Does some exalted virtue shine, And Albion's happiness we trace Through all the features of his face. O may I live to hail the day, When the glad nation shall survey Their...

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