The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volum 80

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Archibald Constable and Company, 1817

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Side 439 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Side 358 - Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower ; We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind, In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be, In the soothing thoughts that spring...
Side 247 - Arve and Arveiron at thy base Rave ceaselessly; but thou, most awful Form! Risest from forth thy silent sea of pines, How silently! Around thee and above Deep is the air and dark, substantial, black, An ebon mass: methinks thou piercest it, As with a wedge! But when I look again, It is thine own calm home, thy crystal shrine, Thy habitation from eternity! 0 dread and silent Mount! I gazed upon thee, Till thou, still present to the bodily sense, Didst vanish from my thought : entranced in prayer 1...
Side 257 - TO one who has been long in city pent, 'Tis very sweet to look into the fair And open face of heaven, — to breathe a prayer Full in the smile of the blue firmament. Who is more happy, when, with heart's content, Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair And gentle tale of love and languishment ? Returning home at evening, with an ear Catching the notes of Philomel, — an eye...
Side 434 - Hie away, hie away, Over bank and over brae, Where the copsewood is the greenest, Where the fountains glisten sheenest, Where the lady fern grows strongest, Where the morning dew lies longest, Where the black-cock sweetest sips it, Where the fairy latest trips it ; Hie to haunts right seldom seen, Lovely, lonesome, cool and green, Over bank and over brae, Hie away, hie away. "Do the verses he sings...
Side 248 - And now, beloved Stowey ! I behold Thy church-tower, and, methinks, the four huge elms Clustering, which mark the mansion of my friend ; And close behind them, hidden from my view, Is my own lowly cottage, where my babe And my babe's mother dwell in peace...
Side 437 - J'ai conçu pour mon crime une juste terreur. J'ai pris la vie en haine, et ma flamme en horreur. Je voulais en mourant prendre soin de ma gloire, Et dérober au jour une flamme si noire.
Side 16 - I have drawn my sword in the present generous struggle for the rights of men, yet I am not in arms as an American, nor am I in pursuit of riches. My fortune is liberal enough, having no wife nor family, and having lived long enough to know that riches cannot insure happiness.
Side 358 - To acts which they abhor; though I bewail This triumph, yet the pity of my heart Prevents me not from owning, that the law, By which Mankind now suffers, is most just. For by superior energies ; more strict Affiance in each other; faith more firm In their unhallowed principles; the Bad Have fairly earned a victory o'er the weak, The vacillating, inconsistent Good.
Side 360 - The whole dramatic moral of CORIOLANUS is that those who have little shall have less, and that those who have much shall take all that others have left. The people are poor; therefore they ought to be starved. They are slaves; therefore they ought to be beaten. They work hard; therefore they ought to be treated like beasts of burden. They are ignorant; therefore they ought not to be allowed to feel that they want food, or clothing, or rest, that they are enslaved, oppressed, and miserable.

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