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THE

WRITINGS

OF

GEORGE WASHINGTON;

BEING HIS

CORRESPONDENCE, ADDRESSES, MESSAGES, AND OTHER

PAPERS, OFFICIAL AND PRIVATE,

SELECTED AND PUBLISHED FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS;

WITH

A LIFE OF THE AUTHOR,

NOTES, AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

By JARED SPARKS.

VOLUME IX.

BOSTON:

FERDINAND ANDREWS, PUBLISHER.

1839.

9.).

Checked
Alay 1913

Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year one thousand eight

hundred and thirty-five, by Jared SPARKS, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

COLLECT

STEREOTYPED.

CAMBRIDGE:
FOL SOM, WELLS, AND THURSTON,

PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.

PRIVATE LETTERS

AFTER THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

TO GOVERNOR CLINTON.

Mount Vernon, 28 December, 1783. MY DEAR SIR, After as prosperous a journey as could be expected at this late season of the year, I arrived at my seat the day before Christmas, having previously divested myself of my official character. I am now a private citizen on the banks of the Potomac, where I should be happy to see you, if your public business would ever permit, and where, in the mean time, I shall fondly cherish the remembrance of all your former friendship.

Although I scarcely need tell you, how much I have been satisfied with every instance of your public conduct, yet I could not suffer Colonel Walker (whose merits are too well known to you to need a recommendation of him from me, if any thing should cast up favorable to his wishes,) to depart for New York, without giving your Excellency one more testimony of the obligations I consider myself under for the spirited and able assistance, which I have often derived from the State under your administration.

The scene is at last closed. I feel myself eased of a load of public care. I hope to spend the remainder

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of my days in cultivating the affections of good men, and in the practice of the domestic virtues. Permit me still to consider you in the number of my friends, and to wish you every felicity.

Mrs. Washington joins me in presenting the compliments of the season, with our best respects, to Mrs. Clinton and the family. I have the honor to be, &c.

TO RICHARD VARICK.

Mount Vernon, 1 January, 1784. DEAR SIR, From the moment I left the city of New York, until my arrival at this place, I have been so much occupied by a variety of concerns, that I could not find leisure to acknowledge the receipt of your two favors of the 4th and 7th ultimo.

The public and other papers, which were committed to your charge, and the books in which they have been recorded under your inspection, having come safe to hand, I take this first opportunity of signifying my entire approbation of the manner in which you have executed the important duties of recording secretary, and the satisfaction I feel in having my papers so properly arranged, and so correctly recorded ; and I beg you will accept my thanks for the care and attention, which you have given to this business. I am fully convinced, that neither the present age nor posterity will consider the time and labor, which have been employed in accomplishing it, unprofitably spent.

I beg you will be persuaded, that I shall take a pleasure in asserting on every occasion the sense I entertain of the fidelity, skill, and indefatigable industry manifested by you in the performance of your pub

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