Junius: Including Letters by the Same Writer, Under Other Signatures, (now First Collected) ; to which are Added, His Confidential Correspondence with Mr. Wilkes, and His Private Letters Addressed to Mr. H.S. Woodfall ; with a Preliminary Essay, Notes, Fac-similes, &c. ...

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G. Woodfall, 1812 - 516 sider
 

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Side 64 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Side 64 - That the king can do no wrong, is admitted without reluctance. We separate the amiable, good-natured prince, from the folly and treachery of his servants, and the private virtues of the man, from the vices of his government. Were it not for this just distinction, I know not whether your majesty's condition, or that of the English nation, would deserve most to be lamented. I would prepare your mind for a favorable reception of truth, by removing every painful offensive idea of personal reproach.
Side 61 - When the complaints of a brave and powerful people are observed to increase in proportion to the wrongs they have suffered; when, instead of sinking into submission, they are roused to resistance ; the time will soon arrive a,t which every inferior consideration must yield to the security of the sovereign, and to the general safety of •the state.
Side 165 - ... him. That great lawyer, that honest man, saw your whole conduct in the light that I do. — After years of ineffectual resistance to the pernicious principles introduced by your Lordship, and uniformly supported by your humble friends upon the bench, he determined to quit a court, whose proceedings and decisions he could neither assent to with honour, nor oppose with success.
Side 103 - Majesty to give the answer to a late humble address, remonstrance, and petition, of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Livery of the city of London, in Common Hall assembled, is were negatived, and a previous question put on all the rest.
Side 69 - ... situation. Hardly serious at first, he is now an enthusiast. The coldest bodies warm with opposition, the hardest sparkle in collision. There is a holy mistaken zeal in politics as well as religion. By persuading others, we convince ourselves. The passions are engaged, and create a maternal affection in the mind, which forces us to love the cause, for which we suffer.
Side 68 - The rays of royal indignation, collected upon him, served only to illuminate, and could not consume.
Side 74 - The people of Ireland have been uniformly plundered and oppressed. In return, they give you every day fresh marks of their resentment. They despise the miserable governor you have sent them, because he is the creature of Lord Bute; nor is it from any natural confusion in their ideas that they are so ready to confound the original of a king with the disgraceful representation of him.
Side 67 - ... in the fatal malignity of their passions. At your accession to the throne, the whole system of government was altered, not from wisdom or deliberation, but because it had been adopted by your predecessor. A little personal motive of pique and resentment was sufficient to remove the ablest servants of the crown...
Side 85 - Without consulting your minister, call together your whole council. Let it appear to the public, that you can determine and act for yourself. Come forward to your people. Lay aside the wretched formalities of a king; and speak to your subjects with the spirit of a man, and in the language of a gentleman. Tell them you have been fatally deceived.

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