History of the United States from the Earliest Discovery of America to the Present Time: 1860-1888

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903
 

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Side 240 - A neutral Government is bound — First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Side 251 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Side 248 - American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbors, and creeks of Nova Scotia, Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled ; but so soon as the same or either of them shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such settlement, without a previous agreement for that purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.
Side 21 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Side 251 - And the United States hereby renounce forever, any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure fish on. or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbours of his Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Side 188 - States; but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired, and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Side 247 - It is agreed that the people of the United States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bauk and on all the other banks of Newfoundland ; also in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish.
Side 166 - ... restores him to health ; on the ermine which decorates the judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal; on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice ; on the brass nails of the coffin, and the ribands of the bride— at bed or board, couchant or levant, we must pay.
Side 90 - ... force was 78,000. Night put an end to the luckless carnage. Burnside's generals dissuaded him from renewing the attack next day, and the army re-crossed the river. They had lost 12,300 men; the Confederates 5,000. A writer to the London Times from Lee's headquarters called this December 13th a day " memorable to the historian of the Decline and Fall of the American Republic.
Side 248 - Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish. And also that the inhabitants of the United States shall have liberty to take fish of every kind on such part of the coast of Newfoundland...

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