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The circumstance which led to the publication of these Addresses, may be understood from the following correspondence.

“37, St. James's Place. “ MY DEAR SIR, “Some noblemen and gentlemen, who have observed with much interest, your exertions in defence of the Protestant Institutions of the kingdom, are desirous that the Speeches you delivered on various occasions, within the last year, should be collected and preserved in a permanent form ; and are of opinion that their publication might render extensive service to the good caụse in support of which they were spoken. In their behalf I am commissioned, and on my own I gladly accept the commission, to request that, in compliance with our wishes, you will publish a corrected report of those Addresses.

“ Believe me, my dear Sir,

“ Very faithfully,
“ Your obedient servant,

“ WILLIAM VERNER.”

To the Rev. Mortimer O'Sullivan.”

MY DEAR SIR, “ I feel honored by the request you have conveyed to me, and am very grateful for the kind, although too flattering terms in which you express your desire that I should comply with it.

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“ That your praises of my humble efforts exceed their merits, I am, and must be sensible; but I feel it, at the same time, gratifying to know that those, who with you have been betrayed into this generous error, are conspicuous for their devotedness to the cause of truth; and that their favorable opinion is signified by one thoroughly acquainted with my natural disinclination to the exertions which have been so partially commended. You know with what reluctance I suffered the occupations of the quiet and happy obscurity in which Divine Providence had given me all that I desired, to be for a season interrupted; and you do not require to be informed that nothing but a paramount sense of public duty, and I may add, of public danger, could influence me to come forth for the purpose of aiding in the defence of our most precious and sacred institutions, and in the endeavour to procure justice for my cruelly persecuted brethren.

“ I shall pay to your request the respectful attention to which I feel it is entitled. Whatever my estimate may have been, of exertions which the difficulty of evil days constrained me to make, the opinion expressed by you, and by those in whose name you write, prescribes to me my course of duty. Addresses which you think worthy of being preserved in a permanent form, I shall endeavour to collect and arrange; and must ever hold it a subject of thankfulness, that they have been held useful, and have procured testimonies of approbation from so many of the wise

and good.

“ I have the honor to be,

My dear Sir,
“ With all good wishes,

Most truly yours,

“ MORTIMER O'SULLIVAN.” “To Lieut. Col. Verner, M. P.

' 37, St. James's Place.”

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ERRATUM.

Page 20 line 15, for “ do so," read “ make them known.”

131 and throughout the Address, for “ Bath Herald," read “ Bath Journal.”

At a Meeting of the ProtestANTS OF IRELAND, held

at the Mansion House, Dublin, on Thursday, August 14, 1834.

The Right Hon. the Lord Mayor in the Chair,

The circumstances under which we meet, and the animating addresses to which you have so fully responded, have taught you this stern but salutary truth, that now, for the protection of your dearest interests, for the maintenance of your religion, for defence of life, except in the resources which your own wisdom and union and resolution shall provide, you have no earthly dependence.

I am glad to find you receive the announcement as it should be received by men. Let me not be mistaken. Far be it from us to doubt the cordial friendship of our brethren in England. Even if it could for a moment be forgotten, the presence of the distinguished personage who has honored our meeting—the representative of what is best and noblest in England, representative of a class which has ever watched with most vigilant and most benevolent anxiety over the interests of their Protestant brethren here, would recal it to our remembrance. (A) But, that you should be benefited by the exertions of your friends, you must be true to yourselves. Your cause has been blackened by foul misrepresentations. You must be industrious to refute them ;-and, while they are in process of correction, you must be united, and prepared to meet the difficulties to which they now leave you exposed. England, you must remember, is not as she was. The moral pestilence of expediency has found, in her, a body prepared for it. That the stupor, in which she has yielded to pernicious counsel, and abused sound principle, will be broken, and that energies now dormant will be roused into wise action,

B

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